Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Full Access It feels like it’s me: Interpersonal multisensory stimulation enhances visual remapping of touch from other to self

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

It feels like it’s me: Interpersonal multisensory stimulation enhances visual remapping of touch from other to self

  • PDF
  • HTML
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

For more content, see Multisensory Research and Spatial Vision.

We constantly feel, see and move our body, and have no doubt that it is our own, distinct from the body of other people. At the same time, understanding other people’s feelings in social interactions depends on the ability to map onto one’s own body the observed experiences on the bodies of others. It has been shown that the more similar others are perceived to be to our self, the stronger this mapping is. While previous studies have focused on existing similarities or differences between self and other, we ask whether the experimental change of the self-other boundaries can lead to changes in somatosensory processing. It has been shown that the perception of tactile stimuli on the face is enhanced if participants concurrently observe a face being touched. This Visual Remapping of Touch (VRT; Ladavas and Serino, 2010) is enhanced the more similar others are perceived to be to the self, and is strongest when viewing one’s face (Serino et al., 2008, 2009). We used the enfacement illusion that relies on synchronous interpersonal multisensory stimulation (IMS; Sforza et al., 2010; Tsakiris, 2008) to manipulate self-other boundaries. Following synchronous, but not asynchronous IMS, the self-related enhancement of the VRT effect was extended to the other individual. These findings suggest that shared multi-sensory experiences represent one key way in which the boundaries and perceived similarity between self and others can be overcome, as evidenced by changes in somatosensory processing of shared tactile stimuli.

Affiliations: 1: 1Royal Holloway, University of London, GB; 2: 2Centro studi e ricerche in Neuroscienze Cognitive, University of Bologna, IT

We constantly feel, see and move our body, and have no doubt that it is our own, distinct from the body of other people. At the same time, understanding other people’s feelings in social interactions depends on the ability to map onto one’s own body the observed experiences on the bodies of others. It has been shown that the more similar others are perceived to be to our self, the stronger this mapping is. While previous studies have focused on existing similarities or differences between self and other, we ask whether the experimental change of the self-other boundaries can lead to changes in somatosensory processing. It has been shown that the perception of tactile stimuli on the face is enhanced if participants concurrently observe a face being touched. This Visual Remapping of Touch (VRT; Ladavas and Serino, 2010) is enhanced the more similar others are perceived to be to the self, and is strongest when viewing one’s face (Serino et al., 2008, 2009). We used the enfacement illusion that relies on synchronous interpersonal multisensory stimulation (IMS; Sforza et al., 2010; Tsakiris, 2008) to manipulate self-other boundaries. Following synchronous, but not asynchronous IMS, the self-related enhancement of the VRT effect was extended to the other individual. These findings suggest that shared multi-sensory experiences represent one key way in which the boundaries and perceived similarity between self and others can be overcome, as evidenced by changes in somatosensory processing of shared tactile stimuli.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/18784763/25/0/18784763_025_00_S200_text.html;jsessionid=0mwXtBdMsSiIb3S0B17qfKye.x-brill-live-03?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x648422&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x648422
Loading

Data & Media loading...

1. Ladavas E. , Serino A. ( 2010). "How the sense of body influences the sense of touch", in: The Cognitive Neuroscience of Mind: A Tribute to Michael S. Gazzaniga, Reuter-Lorenz P. A. , Baynes K. , Mangun G. R. , Phelps E. A. (Eds), pp.  155171. MIT Press, Cambridge, MA (USA). http://dx.doi.org/10.7551/mitpress/9780262014014.003.0112
2. Serino A. , Giovagnoli G. , Ladavas E. ( 2009). "I feel what you feel if you are similar to me", PLoS One Vol 4( 3), e4930. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0004930
3. Serino A. , Pizzoferrato F. , Ladavas E. ( 2008). "Viewing a face (especially one’s own face) being touched enhances tactile perception on the face", Psychological Science Vol 19, 434438. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9280.2008.02105.x
4. Sforza A. , Bufalari I. , Haggard P. , Aglioti S. M. ( 2010). "My face in yours: Visuo–tactile facial stimulation influences sense of identity", Social Neuroscience Vol 5, 148162. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17470910903205503
5. Tsakiris M. ( 2008). "Looking for myself: current multisensory input alters self-face recognition", PLoS One Vol 3( 12), e4040. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0004040
http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x648422
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x648422
2012-01-01
2016-12-09

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation