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ANTENNAL RECEPTORS IN PUERULUS AND POSTPUERULUS STAGES OF THE ROCK LOBSTER PANULIRUS CYGNUS (DECAPODA: PALINURIDAE) AND THEIR POTENTIAL ROLE IN PUERULUS NAVIGATION

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ABSTRACT This study describes the sensory structures on the antennae and antennules of the puerulus and postpuerulus stage juveniles of the western rock lobster Panulirus cygnus. Both stages have short and long spines, which probably function in protection and in contact-detection. Both also possess setae structurally similar to those shown to be near-field vibration receptors in other crustaceans. Both have aesthetasc setae on the antennules and petaloid setae on the antennae, with both types of setae appearing to be chemosensory. The puerulus stage has an almost continuous linear series of pinnate setae that overlie each other and also the segmental boundaries along the antenna in such a way that the series is well positioned to act as a detector for vibration of the whole antenna. This arrangement is unique to the puerulus stage, which is also noted for its 40-60-km directional swim from the offshore waters to the coast. We suggest that the complex receptor system formed by the antennae and the pinnate setal system plays a role in navigation by allowing the animal to orient to vibrational clues associated with the coast.

10.1163/193724087X00108
/content/journals/10.1163/193724087x00108
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/content/journals/10.1163/193724087x00108
2017-12-15

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