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DISTRIBUTION OF JUVENILE AND ADULT GHOST SHRIMPS, CALLIANASSA JAPONICA ORTMANN (THALASSINIDEA), ON AN INTERTIDAL SAND FLAT: INTRASPECIFIC FACILITATION AS A POSSIBLE PATTERN-GENERATING FACTOR

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ABSTRACT On an intertidal sand flat in western Kyushu, Japan, adults of the ghost shrimp Callianassa japonica Ortmann inhabited the upper tidal zone in 1979. Their distribution later expanded greatly to occupy almost the entire sand flat by 1983, the situation remaining unchanged until the end of the study in 1990. Both larval settlement and adult migration accounted for the expansion of the distribution. The positions of the tidal zones, which had the highest densities of newly settled juveniles, shifted, along with the distribution expansion of adults, but were always around the seaward margin of the adult habitat, with densities gradually decreasing shoreward. After maximum distribution expansion was attained, the densities of adults were higher seaward along the elevation gradient, reflecting spatial variations in juvenile density. Occupation of deep-sediment layers by juveniles and hence their escape from mortality-causing factors near the sediment surface might be facilitated through the bioturbation of sediments and by the presence of burrows of established adults. This appears to be responsible for the observed distribution patterns.

10.1163/193724093X00543
/content/journals/10.1163/193724093x00543
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/content/journals/10.1163/193724093x00543
2017-08-21

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