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NEUROENDOCRINE INFLUENCE ON WHOLE ANIMAL AND TISSUE RESPIRATION AND ON OSMOIONIC REGULATION IN THE HOLOLIMNETIC SHRIMP MACROBRACHIUM POTIUNA (MÜLLER, 1880)

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image of Journal of Crustacean Biology

ABSTRACT The role of the supraesophageal ganglion (SEG) and the optic ganglia in the eyestalks (ES) on the control of respiratory metabolism and osmoregulation was examined in a fresh-water shrimp, Macrobrachium potiuna. Results suggested that a factor(s) which depresses the total O2 consumption is present in SEG and ES extracts and in the hemolymph of M. potiuna. The extracts also modified the osmolality and the concentration of major ionic species in the hemolymph. In vitro experiments corroborated the above findings. Muscle metabolism was markedly depressed by a factor(s) present in SEG and ES extracts as well as in the hemolymph of M. potiuna adapted to fresh water or exposed to high salinity. This effect probably offsets the tendency to a high O, consumption at low and high salinities as observed in intact animals. Additionally, SEG extracts can either stimulate or inhibit gill metabolism. These results agree with the effects noted in whole animal osmoregulatory response. A preliminary inspection suggests that the molecule(s) involved in such effects is heat stable and chymotripsin-sensitive. The compensatory response which results from its action is possibly retained from movement from marine to fresh-water adaptation.

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/content/journals/10.1163/193724094x00452
1994-01-01
2017-04-29

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