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SIZE AND MATURITY STAGE OBSERVATIONS OF THE DEEP-SEA ISOPOD BATHYNOMUS DOEDERLEINI ORTMANN, 1894 (FLABELLIFERA: CIROLANIDAE), IN EASTERN TAIWAN

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image of Journal of Crustacean Biology

ABSTRACT Seven collections of the deep-sea isopod Bathynomus doederleini Ortmann were made, using baited traps in waters of eastern Taiwan between 300-500-m depth from June 1990 to February 1992. Body length, developmental stage, and gonad development were recorded for individuals. Individuals (N = 2,007) ranged from 28-138 mm in length with seasonal variation in size distribution. Recruitment (manca stage) was high between May and September. Mature individuals with fully developed secondary sex organs represented 3.6% of all the samples collected. Males, with penes, could be identified at a smaller size (body length 50 mm) than females (88 mm), which had vestigial or developed oostegites. Eight of 10 mature males, i.e., with appendices masculinae, all larger than 100 mm, had testes. A higher frequency (>73%) of large females (> 100 mm) possessed developed ovaries than small females (13% between 88-100 mm). Among egg-carrying females no correlation was found between size and fecundity. No seasonality of reproductive activity was observed. The sex ratio was significantly different from 1:1 among large individuals (>95 mm), and was biased toward females.

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/content/journals/10.1163/193724094x00489
1994-01-01
2016-12-03

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