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POPULATION STRUCTURE, GROWTH, AND FECUNDITY OF THE KELP FOREST MYSID HOLMESIMYSIS COSTATA IN MONTEREY BAY, CALIFORNIA

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ABSTRACT Field and laboratory studies were made in Monterey Bay, California, on Holmesimysis costata, an ecologically important mysid crustacean in West Coast kelp forests that is currently being used as a water quality indicator organism. Nearly all the mysids were found in the upper portions of the kelp canopy. Relative abundance, size, and male/female/juvenile frequency of occurrence varied substantially throughout the 2-year study. Abundance, ranging monthly from 254-3,359 individuals per 300-1 sample, correlated with sea-water temperature the first year, but not the second. Laboratory growth rate, determined by measuring carapace length, was approximately linear for the first 37 days after hatching (16 µm day―1), after which it increased and became more variable until sexual maturity was reached at 62 days (females 41 µm day―1, males 35 µm day―1) Brooding females were collected thoughout 1 year, but highest fecundities (maximum 45 juveniles in 1 female) occurred between May and August. Mean field fecundities (27.4 ± 6.6 juveniles per female) were higher than those of laboratory-reared females (16.4 ± 4.3). These results indicate that there is high year-round production of these mysids, with peak production in summer when predation by recruiting rockfishes would be most intense.

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/content/journals/10.1163/193724094x00623
1994-01-01
2016-12-10

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