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USE OF ANTIBIOTICS TO REDUCE VARIABILITY IN AMPHIPOD MORTALITY AND GROWTH

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ABSTRACT The antibiotics penicillin-G and streptomycin sulfate, commonly used to grow axenic cultures of diatoms, consistently reduce mortalities in experiments using laboratory cultures of the gammaridean amphipod Corophium spinicorne. These antibiotics do not change average weightspecific growth rates of the test organisms. Applications of antibiotics can reduce the variability within nutritional and survival-related experiments, and thus differences between treatments can be detected. This technique can improve the results from bioassay and toxicity tests using amphipods when bacterial-induced mortalities appear to impact the quality of test data.

10.1163/193724096X00081
/content/journals/10.1163/193724096x00081
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/content/journals/10.1163/193724096x00081
2017-12-15

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