Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

SPECIES DIFFERENTIATION IN SYNIDOTEA (ISOPODA: IDOTEIDAE) AND RECOGNITION OF INTRODUCED MARINE SPECIES: A REPLY TO CHAPMAN AND CARLTON

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

This Article is currently unavailable for purchase.
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

Cover image Placeholder

ABSTRACT Nominal species of the idoteid isopod genus Synidotea from Japan (S. laevidorsalis), western U.S.A. (S. laticauda), South Africa (S. hirtipes), and Australia (S. keablei and S. grisea) are shown to be morphologically distinct. Others probably are also. Contrary to the views of Chapman and Carlton (1991, 1994), the Japanese species has not been widely distributed by shipping. The Australian species fail several of Chapman and Carlton's attributes of introduced species: their recent discovery and restricted distribution are anticipated in a poorly explored fauna, there is no evidence of postintroduction range extension, no known human mechanisms of introduction exist, they are not associated with known introductions, nor with altered environments, and exotic evolutionary origin cannot be assessed while the phylogeny of the genus is not known. The species in the western U.S.A. is ecologically as well as morphologically distinct, being estuarine rather than marine. A record of S. laevidorsalis from the Gironde estuary, France, is, in fact, of S. laticauda and therefore an introduction from the U.S.A. rather than from Japan. This study demonstrates the importance of careful taxonomic analysis before it is concluded that marine species are introduced.

10.1163/193724096X00171
/content/journals/10.1163/193724096x00171
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
10
5
Loading
Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/193724096x00171
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/193724096x00171
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/193724096x00171
2017-08-19

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation