Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

ROLE OF LUNGS AND GILLS IN AN AFRICAN FRESH-WATER CRAB, POTAMONAUTES WARRENI (DECAPODA: POTAMOIDEA), IN GAS EXCHANGE WITH WATER, WITH AIR, AND DURING EXERCISE

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Journal of Crustacean Biology

ABSTRACT Respiratory gas transport and acid-base state were investigated in the crab Potamonautes warreni breathing air or water for at least 24 h to assess the role of the lungs and gills. The efferent pulmonary and arterial samples had similar O2 content and thus either the lungs received most of the hemolymph flow or the lungs and gills were of equal importance during air-breathing. The gills were more important in immersed crabs. The O2 partial pressure in arterial hemolymph decreased from 8.6 kPa in air-breathing crabs to 4.5 kPa in water-breathing crabs. Despite an increase in O2 diffusion limitation during water-breathing (Ldiff = 0.78) compared to air-breathing crabs (Ldiff = 0.57) the arterial-venous O2 content difference did not change. In immersed crabs, the CO, content of the hemolymph (6.1 mmol·L–1) was half that in air-breathing crabs, but the pH remained unchanged at pH 7.4. Potamonautes warreni showed no specific adaptations to the >1400-m altitude of its habitat other than apparently relatively improved O2 diffusion. Polamonauteswarreni performed well during exercise in air. Crabs exercised at slow speed (1.8 m·min–1) experienced smaller hemolymph acid-base perturbations (ApH = 0.18) than crabs exercised at fast speed (ApH = 0.36; 3 m·min–1). While the partial pressure of 0, in the arterial and efferent pulmonary hemolymph during 20 min of fast exercise decreased from near 9 to 6 kPa or less, the hemocyanin 0, saturation was maintained near 80% and the arterial-venous O2 difference doubled. An increase in Hc-O2 affinity in exercising animals partially offset the Bohr effect and assisted in 0, uptake at the gas-exchange surfaces. The relative importance of lungs and gills in gas exchange after exercise in air was apparently similar to that in resting crabs. There was little requirement for anaerobiosis during submaximal exercise. Hemolymph L-lactate levels peaked at 3.6 mmol·L–1 after 20 min of fast exercise and were similar to L-lactate levels in the muscle.

Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/193724097x00035
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/193724097x00035
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/193724097x00035
1997-01-01
2016-12-05

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Journal of Crustacean Biology — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation