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Full Access Microsatellites for North American species of Triops (Branchiopoda: Notostraca)

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Microsatellites for North American species of Triops (Branchiopoda: Notostraca)

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We used 454 pyrosequencing to discover more than 3000 candidate microsatellite markers for three putative species of tadpole shrimp in the genus Triops. We selected 42 of these candidates, consisting of 12 systems identified in Triops longicaudatus “long,” 16 identified in Triops longicaudatus “short,” and 14 identified in Triops newberryi. Out of these potential loci we identified between five and eight polymorphic microsatellite systems per “species.” By implementing an additional cross amplification experiment with the microsatellite markers mentioned above and further testing 15 microsatellite markers initially identified in the European Triops cancriformis, we successfully transferred 17 microsatellite markers within the three North American Triops and found three new microsatellites, one polymorphic, that will amplify in T. cancriformis. The reported genetic methods are powerful molecular tools to acquire new detailed information at the interface of ecology, evolution and development, which will facilitate understanding phenotypic plasticity, breeding systems, and adaptation in this taxonomically-confusing group of “living fossils.”

Affiliations: 1: 1Unit of Molecular Zoology, Chair of Zoology, Department of Animal Science, Technische Universität München, Hans-Carl-von-Carlowitz-Platz 2, 85354 Freising, Germany; 2: 2Department of Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Ecology and Molecular Biology Program, New Mexico State University, Box 30003, MSC 4901, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8003, USA; 3: 3Department of Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Ecology and Department of Extension Animal Sciences and Natural Resources, New Mexico State University, Box 30003, MSC 4901, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8003, USA

We used 454 pyrosequencing to discover more than 3000 candidate microsatellite markers for three putative species of tadpole shrimp in the genus Triops. We selected 42 of these candidates, consisting of 12 systems identified in Triops longicaudatus “long,” 16 identified in Triops longicaudatus “short,” and 14 identified in Triops newberryi. Out of these potential loci we identified between five and eight polymorphic microsatellite systems per “species.” By implementing an additional cross amplification experiment with the microsatellite markers mentioned above and further testing 15 microsatellite markers initially identified in the European Triops cancriformis, we successfully transferred 17 microsatellite markers within the three North American Triops and found three new microsatellites, one polymorphic, that will amplify in T. cancriformis. The reported genetic methods are powerful molecular tools to acquire new detailed information at the interface of ecology, evolution and development, which will facilitate understanding phenotypic plasticity, breeding systems, and adaptation in this taxonomically-confusing group of “living fossils.”

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/content/journals/10.1163/1937240x-00002118
2013-01-01
2016-12-11

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