Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

FOSSIL CRABS FROM TEPEE BUTTES, SUBMARINE SEEPS OF THE LATE CRETACEOUS PIERRE SHALE, SOUTH DAKOTA AND COLORADO, U.S.A.

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

This Article is currently unavailable for purchase.
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

Cover image Placeholder

Tepee Buttes are low conical hills which occur in scattered clusters along the strike of the Late Cretaceous Pierre Shale near Pueblo, Colorado, and around the Black Hills of South Dakota, Montana, and Wyoming. These erosional landforms develop around resistant columnar limestone masses thought to have been deposited by warm, methane-rich, submarine springs within relatively homogeneous, less resistant claystones. Origin of the Tepee Buttes is attributed to dewatering of underlying claystones. The submarine springs provided a unique habitat on the Western Interior Cretaceous sea bottom for growth of large populations of the lucinid bivalve, Nymphalucina occidentalis, often preserved in living position in reef-like masses encircling the spring vents. Concentration of abundant biomass immediately around the spring vents formed the basis of communities preserved as the Nymphalucina Assemblage dominated by N. occidentalis, but including ammonoid cephalopods, other bivalved mollusks, gastropods, foraminiferans, and a few decapod crustaceans. Fragments of grounded fossilized gymnosperm and angiosperm wood riddled with Teredo borings are also found on the vent cores. Twenty specimens of decapod crustaceans representing three new species of crabs were collected from Tepee Buttes near Oelrichs and Newell, South Dakota, and collecting near Pueblo, Colorado, yielded specimens belonging to three new species, as well as one specimen of Hoplitocarcinus punctatus. The new taxa include Heus foersteri, new genus and species, Raninella manningi, new species (family Raninidae), and Plagiophthalmus bjorki, new species (family Prosopidae ). Descriptions, illustrations, and comparisons of new taxa with previously described members of the family are given.

Affiliations: 1: Department of Geology and Geography, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, Georgia 30460-8149, U.S.A. gabishop@gsvms2.cc.gasou.edu; 2: National Marine Fisheries Service Systematics Laboratory, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. 20560-0153, U.S.A.

10.1163/1937240X-90000031
/content/journals/10.1163/1937240x-90000031
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
10
5
Loading
Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/1937240x-90000031
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/1937240x-90000031
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/1937240x-90000031
2017-11-21

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation