Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

THE FUNCTIONAL MORPHOLOGY OF GNATHOPODS: IMPORTANCE IN GROOMING, AND VARIATION WITH REGARD TO HABITAT, IN TALITROIDEAN AMPHIPODS

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

This Article is currently unavailable for purchase.
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

Cover image Placeholder

ABSTRACT Six talitroidean amphipod species from terrestrial, semiterrestrial, fresh-water, and marine habitats were examined with scanning electron microscopy. A number of specialized and ornate grooming organs are described in which cuticular scales and setae have been modified into bristles, fans, combs, and brushes. Terrestrial, semiterrestrial, and aquatic groups possess grooming modifications quite distinct from each other, while individual species, within a single habitat group, differ much less. The structure and function of several nongrooming specializations is also discussed. Although sexual dimorphism of arthropod grooming structures is rare, such dimorphism is present in the Amphipoda. This dimorphism stems from the use of the major grooming appendages as precopulatory organs in the male. The cuticular structures described in this study are used to scrape and brush the body during grooming movements, presumably enabling these crustaceans to exploit better their environment.

Affiliations: 1: Department of Zoology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210; present address, Newfound Harbor Marine Institute, Route 3, Box 170, Big Pine Key, Florida 33043.

10.1163/1937240X82X00310
/content/journals/10.1163/1937240x82x00310
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
10
5
Loading
Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/1937240x82x00310
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/1937240x82x00310
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/1937240x82x00310
2017-10-19

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation