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COMPARISON OF MORPHOLOGIES OF PROBOPYRUS BITHYNIS, P. FLORIDENSIS, AND P. PANDALICOLA LARVAE REARED IN CULTURE (ISOPODA, EPICARIDEA)

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ABSTRACT Larvae of Probopyrus pandalicola, P. floridensis, and P. bithynis were raised experimentally in the laboratory. Development times of larvae (epicaridium to cryptoniscus) and intermediate host selection were the same for all parasite species. We used SEM and LM to obtain both morphological and morphometric data on first and final stage larvae from each species. While P. bithynis larvae are distinct morphologically, P. floridensis and P. pandalicola larvae are similar to one another, but often differ significantly in several body measurements. Furthermore, cryptonisci of P. floridensis and P. pandalicola differ in regard to host specificity, pigmentation, and swimming speed. The authors conclude that P. pandalicola, P. bithynis, and P. floridensis should retain separate species status. Finally, the morphogenetic interrelationships of our observations are discussed and we suggest that P. bithynis is more advanced phylogenetically than either P. pandalicola or P. floridensis.

Affiliations: 1: Department of Biology, University of Southern Mississippi, Southern Station, Box 5018, Hattiesburg, Mississippi 39406; (WED, present address) Department of Physiology, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, Missouri 65201

10.1163/1937240X82X00518
/content/journals/10.1163/1937240x82x00518
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/content/journals/10.1163/1937240x82x00518
2017-09-25

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