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SIZE FREQUENCY PATTERN OF EUPHAUSIA SUPERBA IN THE ANTARCTIC PENINSULA WATERS IN THE AUSTRAL SUMMER OF 1983

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image of Journal of Crustacean Biology

ABSTRACT In the austral summer of 1983, schools of krill from Bransfield Strait and Palmer Archipelago were analyzed for composition in terms of size frequencies and maturity stages. Juveniles dominated in all schools, and mature animals never exceeded 6.8% of the animals at any sampling site. Gravid females were encountered in only four out of 15 schools and were never more frequent than 1.8% of the animals in any school. Among subadults and juveniles the largest animals were found on the inside of Palmer Archipelago. Smaller nonreproductive animals were on the outside and in Bransfield Strait. A second group of juveniles, in a size range of 12-15 mm, was more pronounced north of Crocker Passage than south of the Passage. Their potential origin from a more slowly growing and later spawning Southern Weddell Sea population is discussed. Lack of reproductive animals in the Bransfield/South Shetlands vicinity may reflect yearly variation in this region. A hypothesis is put forward on the basis of this study that Palmer Archipelago is a nursery ground for krill spawned elsewhere. The sites of origin of this krill could be ascertained on the basis of studies of enzyme polymorphism in these populations.

Affiliations: 1: (SEF) Institute of Marine Biology, University of Oslo, Postboks 1064, Blindern, Oslo-3, Norway;; 2: (RYG) Institute of Marine Biomedical Research, University of North Carolina at Wilmington, 7205 Wrightsville Avenue, Wilmington, North Carolina 28403.

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/content/journals/10.1163/1937240x84x00534
1984-01-01
2016-12-03

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