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POPULATION BIOLOGY OF DOROPYGUS PULEX AND GUNENOTOPHORUS GLOBULARIS (COPEPODA), SYMBIONTS WITHIN THE ASCIDIAN POLYCARPA POMARIA (SAVIGNY)

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ABSTRACT The population biology of Doropygus pulex and Gunenotophorus globularis, symbiotic copepods within the ascidian Polycarpa pomaria, was studied at a locality off western Sweden. Both species showed a seasonal pattern of reproduction, having adult females overwintering and a new generation of copepods appearing during autumn. Only Doropygus utilizes the long life-span of the host and possibly reaches ≈ 15 months, while Gunenotophorus reaches ≈ 1 year. While the males of Doropygus were as frequent as the females, the male of Gunenotophorus was recorded only in late autumn. Doropygus pulex was found in 92% of the ascidians, usually with several individuals in each host. Doropygus pulex showed an opportunistic life-style with considerable variation in oviposition and a prolonged release of larvae. This may be reflected in its occurrence in many host species. Gunenotophorus globularis occurred in only 46% of the ascidians and most often with only a single specimen in each host.

Affiliations: 1: (JS, GVH) Institute of Biology, University of Iceland, Grensasvegi 12, 108, Reykjavik, Iceland;; 2: (IS) Kristineberg Marine Biological Station, S-450 34 Fiskebackskil, Sweden.

10.1163/1937240X93X00110
/content/journals/10.1163/1937240x93x00110
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/content/journals/10.1163/1937240x93x00110
2017-08-22

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