Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

WU, MIN AND A LITTLE HAKKA LEXICAL TONE SANDHI: RIGHT AND LEFT

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Cahiers de Linguistique Asie Orientale

An initial assay of Wu and Min lexical tone sandhi opens inquiry into a possible source : Austronesian pitch accent, and into a sandhi origin for the "third" tone ( qu/departing ). One important element in such an assay is the feature Right/Left : focus = preservation, stress, retention, etc, towards the Right or towards the Left. Northern Wu appears to be focus Left, and destressing seems to be spreading in the area. Southern Wu and Min are focus Right. Southern Wu focus does not prevent some Right mergers, and often it is the last two syllables acting together that is the focus. Northern Min shows similarities to Southern Wu, but Southern Min can be said to have no tone sandhi at all : The Amoy et al tone circles appear to be artifacts of changes in isolation values, since they are virtual reconstructions of the probable prototone values. The one Hakka dialect examined appears to be like Northern Min/Southern Wu. On the basis of this assay, I would hazard the guess that in the study of the origin of lexical tone sandhi, Southern Min should be classified with the Cantonese/Thai type, Northern Wu as a separate type heavily influenced by Mandarin, and Southern Wu/Northern Min as the preservation of the oldest, most Austronesianoid type of sandhi. Further speculation would be foolhardly until more information is available and more detailed comparisons and histories are drawn up.

10.1163/19606028-90000279
/content/journals/10.1163/19606028-90000279
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
10
5
Loading
Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/19606028-90000279
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/19606028-90000279
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/19606028-90000279
1984-03-12
2018-09-24

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Cahiers de Linguistique Asie Orientale — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation