Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Zamyatin's novel We, in the context of works and ideas Proletkult

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.
Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the Brill platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites

image of Canadian-American Slavic Studies

[This article provides an analysis of the dystopia We by Zamyatin in the light of Proletcult writings, reading the novel as a parody on their poetry and prose. Zamyatin wisely predicted the future of the society that was the dream of Proletcult writers, who glorified a society of robots, happily and blindly fulfilling all the orders of their government. The “heretic” Zamyatin could foresee the similar development of Russia after the October Revolution, which deprived the Russian people of any individuality and human rights, and depicted the One State and its Benefactor, very much reminding the author of his motherland., This article provides an analysis of the dystopia We by Zamyatin in the light of Proletcult writings, reading the novel as a parody on their poetry and prose. Zamyatin wisely predicted the future of the society that was the dream of Proletcult writers, who glorified a society of robots, happily and blindly fulfilling all the orders of their government. The “heretic” Zamyatin could foresee the similar development of Russia after the October Revolution, which deprived the Russian people of any individuality and human rights, and depicted the One State and its Benefactor, very much reminding the author of his motherland.]

Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/221023911x567605
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/221023911x567605
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/221023911x567605
2011-09-01
2016-07-29

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation