Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Second Thoughts on the End of Utopia? Zamiatin's Film Scenario, “D-503”

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Canadian-American Slavic Studies

[Readings of the denouement of We differ sharply, with important consequences regarding the fate of utopian social construction. Many readers claim that the Single State crushes the MEPHI revolt. Others come to precisely the opposite conclusion. A third group argues that the battle is undecided. The film scenario Zamiatin developed and translated subsequent to his 1931 exile indicates the author opted for the second verdict, one indicating the fall of the regime. Written at least a decade after the novel, the Russian language scenario and its two English translations – published here – may only reflect his later opinions on the heretofore ambiguous ending of his novel., Readings of the denouement of We differ sharply, with important consequences regarding the fate of utopian social construction. Many readers claim that the Single State crushes the MEPHI revolt. Others come to precisely the opposite conclusion. A third group argues that the battle is undecided. The film scenario Zamiatin developed and translated subsequent to his 1931 exile indicates the author opted for the second verdict, one indicating the fall of the regime. Written at least a decade after the novel, the Russian language scenario and its two English translations – published here – may only reflect his later opinions on the heretofore ambiguous ending of his novel.]

Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/221023911x567632
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/221023911x567632
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/221023911x567632
2011-09-01
2016-12-11

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Canadian-American Slavic Studies — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation