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A.E. DOUGLASS AND THE INSTRUMENTS OF DENDROCHRONOLOGY

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<title> SUMMARY </title>This paper discusses the instruments developed by the American astronomer A.E. Douglass (1867-1962) in his research on dendrochronology (the dating of past events through the study of annual growth rings in trees). Douglass improved upon the work of British physicist Arthur Schuster by creating a series of increasingly complex instruments that enabled him to interpret the vast quantities of data generated by climatic phenomena. His most elaborate device was the Merriam Cycloscope of 1936. This generated images that were shown with a scale giving cycle lengths and permitted Douglass rapidly to see non-permanent or intermittent cycles within whole curves.

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10.1163/221058704X00434
/content/journals/10.1163/221058704x00434
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2016-09-27

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