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CHARLES BOURGEOIS (1759-1832), HIS ANTINEWTONIAN COLOUR THEORY AND THE RECONCILEMENT OF ART AND SCIENCE

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[<title> ABSTRACT </title>Between 1810 and 1825, Charles Bourgeois (1759-1832), miniaturist, pigment manufacturer and physicist, developed a colour optics that defied both the Newtonian view of the composite nature of white light and the widely accepted strict separation between science and the arts. In this paper four themes are discussed: the general rules of colour mixing and the resulting three-dimensional colour space CEI (Couleur, Excédent, Intensité); Bourgeois' theory of light as a vehicle for non-luminous colours; His attempt at disproving Newton's central principle of the unequal refrangibility of different colours; and his relation, or rather non-relation, with the Royal Academy of Sciences which considered Bourgeois' theory of light a piece of nonsense., <title> ABSTRACT </title>Between 1810 and 1825, Charles Bourgeois (1759-1832), miniaturist, pigment manufacturer and physicist, developed a colour optics that defied both the Newtonian view of the composite nature of white light and the widely accepted strict separation between science and the arts. In this paper four themes are discussed: the general rules of colour mixing and the resulting three-dimensional colour space CEI (Couleur, Excédent, Intensité); Bourgeois' theory of light as a vehicle for non-luminous colours; His attempt at disproving Newton's central principle of the unequal refrangibility of different colours; and his relation, or rather non-relation, with the Royal Academy of Sciences which considered Bourgeois' theory of light a piece of nonsense.]

10.1163/221058707X00026
/content/journals/10.1163/221058707x00026
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2016-09-29

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