Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

SUSTAINABILITY, VALUES AND QUALITY OF LIFE WHAT WE CAN LEARN FROM CHRISTIAN COMMUNITIES

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Philosophia Reformata

Our consumption and production patterns lead to an increasing pressure on the environment. These patterns are not just accidental, but are rooted in worldviews, including ideas what constitutes quality of life and how mankind should relate to nature. This article presents the results of a study on the worldview, values and behavioral patterns of four religious communities: Amish, Hutterites, Franciscan and Benedictine communities, in order to investigate whether and in what way their values and principles may lead to an impact on the environment and a structure that helps to maintain their quality of life. These communities appear to base their choices not so much on environmental values, but on values such as community, stability, moderation, humility or modesty, the rhythm of life, and reflection. In many cases, these values lead to behavioral choices with a relatively low environmental impact, while they also contribute to their preferred quality of life. In order to enhance sustainability and quality of life in Western society, we may be challenged by three principles: focus on quality instead of quantity, community building, and a process of reflective change. This study about four religious communities has brought to light values that might still connect to ideas about quality of life rooted in broader Western society, and may stimulate a reflective change towards a sustainable development with a lower impact on the environment.

10.1163/22116117-90000529
/content/journals/10.1163/22116117-90000529
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
10
5
Loading
Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/22116117-90000529
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/22116117-90000529
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/22116117-90000529
2012-11-27
2017-12-13

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Philosophia Reformata — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation