Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

THE SECURITY COUNCIL’S ASSET FREEZE AGAINST GADDAFI’S LIBYA AND ITS IMPLEMENTATION IN ITALY

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of The Italian Yearbook of International Law Online

The Security Council’s reaction to breaches of human rights in Gaddafi’s Libya through Resolutions 1970 and 1973 in March 2011 included the adoption of targeted economic sanctions against president Gaddafi, members of his family, collaborators and Libyan State-owned entities – the central bank, State-owned companies and sovereign wealth funds (SWF) – controlled by the individuals in power in Libya. The sanctions consist of an arms embargo, travel bans and the freezing of financial assets and economic resources. Such sanctions are still partially in force at the moment of closing this article. The article examines these Security Council sanctions against the background of past practice and discusses related legal issues, as well as the effectiveness of sanctions. The article goes on to address the peculiar aspects of the implementation of the asset freeze in Italy, in conformity with the implementation regulations of the European Union, in view of the fact that Libyan SWF owned (and still own) substantial equity in major Italian companies. Issues relating to the de-freezing of those assets and their transfer to the new Libyan governmental authorities is also discussed, considering further the interference of the releasing of those assets with the implementation in Italy of the seizure of the same ordered by the prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC) to ensure compensation of the victims of the past regime’s crimes.

10.1163/22116133-90000210
/content/journals/10.1163/22116133-90000210
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
6
3
Loading
Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/22116133-90000210
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/22116133-90000210
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/22116133-90000210
2011-01-01
2016-12-02

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    The Italian Yearbook of International Law Online — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation