Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Open Access ‘Fascism… but with an open mind.’ Reflections on the Contemporary Far Right in (Western) Europe

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

‘Fascism… but with an open mind.’ Reflections on the Contemporary Far Right in (Western) Europe

  • PDF
  • HTML
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

First Lecture on Fascism – Amsterdam – 25 April 2013

image of Fascism

The political science community would have us believe that since the 1980s something entirely detached from historical or neo-fascism has emerged in (Western) Europe - a populist radicalization of mainstream concerns - a novel form of ‘radical right-wing populism.’ Yet the concept of ‘radical right-wing populism’ is deeply problematic because it suggests that (Western) Europe’s contemporary far right has become essentially different from forms of right-wing extremism that preceded it, and from forms of right-wing extremism that continue to exist alongside it. Such an approach, as this First Lecture on Fascism argues, fails to appreciate the critical role that neo-fascism has played, and still plays, in adapting Europe’s contemporary far right to the norms and realities of multi-ethnic, liberal-democratic society. Political scientists should fixate less on novelty and the quest for neat typologies, and instead engage far more seriously with (neo) fascism studies.

Affiliations: 1: Professor of Modern History, Teesside University (UK), N.Copsey@tees.ac.uk

10.1163/22116257-00201008
/content/journals/10.1163/22116257-00201008
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
6
3
Loading

The political science community would have us believe that since the 1980s something entirely detached from historical or neo-fascism has emerged in (Western) Europe - a populist radicalization of mainstream concerns - a novel form of ‘radical right-wing populism.’ Yet the concept of ‘radical right-wing populism’ is deeply problematic because it suggests that (Western) Europe’s contemporary far right has become essentially different from forms of right-wing extremism that preceded it, and from forms of right-wing extremism that continue to exist alongside it. Such an approach, as this First Lecture on Fascism argues, fails to appreciate the critical role that neo-fascism has played, and still plays, in adapting Europe’s contemporary far right to the norms and realities of multi-ethnic, liberal-democratic society. Political scientists should fixate less on novelty and the quest for neat typologies, and instead engage far more seriously with (neo) fascism studies.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/22116257/2/1/22116257_002_01_S01_text.html;jsessionid=PNtjnfcpwF5Ika1XLkvBamU5.x-brill-live-03?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/22116257-00201008&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/22116257-00201008
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/22116257-00201008
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/22116257-00201008
2013-01-01
2016-12-04

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation