Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Open Access On the ‘right’ side? The Radical Right in the Post-Yugoslav Area and the Serbian Case

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

On the ‘right’ side? The Radical Right in the Post-Yugoslav Area and the Serbian Case

  • HTML
  • PDF
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Fascism

The political transformation in the former Yugoslavia during the 1990s was marked by the establishment of a nationalist political mainstream. As a consequence of the Yugoslav wars, nationalism gained broad acceptance in most post-Yugoslav societies. This led to the emergence of many radical right groups, the majority of which support the nationalist policies of the Yugoslav successor states. Since the regime changes in most post-Yugoslav states around the year 2000, the nationalist paradigm has shifted towards a new mainstream, combining the promise of EU accession with neoliberal economic reforms, and slowly abandoning nationalism as a means of political mobilization/demobilization. The radical right groups in the post-Yugoslav area were generally on the right side during the 1990s, but they now face marginalization and even prosecution by state authorities. When pushed to the edge of the political field, however, these groups reorganize themselves. At the same time, several developments are fostering their existence and activities, namely the discursive normalization of nationalism, an unchallenged nationalist revisionism of history, and the reluctance of large parts of society to deal critically with the Yugoslav wars of the 1990s. Finally, due to the lack of strong left-wing parties and organizations, the radical right groups represent the only political alternative to the new pro-European mainstream. This article looks at the formation and development of radical right groups in the post-Yugoslav area, and situates this in the political context of the last two decades.

Affiliations: 1: Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Institut für Geschichtswissenschaften, Lehrstuhl für Südosteuropäische Geschichte, dorde.tomic@hu-berlin.de ; 2: Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Institut für Geschichtswissenschaften, Lehrstuhl für Südosteuropäische Geschichte dorde.tomic@hu-berlin.de

10.1163/22116257-00201012
/content/journals/10.1163/22116257-00201012
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
6
3
Loading

The political transformation in the former Yugoslavia during the 1990s was marked by the establishment of a nationalist political mainstream. As a consequence of the Yugoslav wars, nationalism gained broad acceptance in most post-Yugoslav societies. This led to the emergence of many radical right groups, the majority of which support the nationalist policies of the Yugoslav successor states. Since the regime changes in most post-Yugoslav states around the year 2000, the nationalist paradigm has shifted towards a new mainstream, combining the promise of EU accession with neoliberal economic reforms, and slowly abandoning nationalism as a means of political mobilization/demobilization. The radical right groups in the post-Yugoslav area were generally on the right side during the 1990s, but they now face marginalization and even prosecution by state authorities. When pushed to the edge of the political field, however, these groups reorganize themselves. At the same time, several developments are fostering their existence and activities, namely the discursive normalization of nationalism, an unchallenged nationalist revisionism of history, and the reluctance of large parts of society to deal critically with the Yugoslav wars of the 1990s. Finally, due to the lack of strong left-wing parties and organizations, the radical right groups represent the only political alternative to the new pro-European mainstream. This article looks at the formation and development of radical right groups in the post-Yugoslav area, and situates this in the political context of the last two decades.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/22116257/2/1/22116257_002_01_S05_text.html;jsessionid=uy5o6Y-cz58dHQFYvaC07WSr.x-brill-live-02?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/22116257-00201012&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/22116257-00201012
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/22116257-00201012
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/22116257-00201012
2013-01-01
2016-12-06

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation