Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Open Access Russian Fascism in Exile. A Historical and Phenomenological Perspective on Transnational Fascism

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Russian Fascism in Exile. A Historical and Phenomenological Perspective on Transnational Fascism

  • PDF
  • HTML
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Fascism

Based on the example of Russian fascism in Harbin, Manchuria, this paper demonstrates how the concept, ‘transnational’ can relate to fascism in three ways: as a transnational phenomenon, as a transnational movement and in terms of the study of fascism from a transnational perspective, focusing on the relations and exchanges between fascist movements and how fascism crossed borders. One way of approaching implementing this perspective is to focus on the appropriation and adaptation of fascist bodies of thought into various local contexts. This paper argues that in this context the studies in fascism from a transnational perspective can profit from by focusing on a contemporary understanding of fascism instead of a priori academic definitions. Harbin fascists perceived fascism as a universal idea, which assumed distinct manifestations depending on the particularities of each nation. Therefore in the view of contemporaries fascism also constituted a transnational movement. In a second step this paper reflects on the question to what extend fascist studies could also benefit from the extension from a transnational to a transcultural perspective to better grasp the diverse influences on various manifestation of fascism and deepen our understanding of change and entanglements between fascist movements as well as their respective environments on a global scale.

Affiliations: 1: Cluster of Excellence ‘Asia and Europe’, University of Heidelberg Karl Jaspers Centre for Advanced Transcultural Studies, Bergheimer Str. 58 Building 4311 Room 108, D-69115 Heidelberg, Germany, hohler@asia-europe.uni-heidelberg.de

10.1163/22116257-00202002
/content/journals/10.1163/22116257-00202002
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
6
3
Loading

Based on the example of Russian fascism in Harbin, Manchuria, this paper demonstrates how the concept, ‘transnational’ can relate to fascism in three ways: as a transnational phenomenon, as a transnational movement and in terms of the study of fascism from a transnational perspective, focusing on the relations and exchanges between fascist movements and how fascism crossed borders. One way of approaching implementing this perspective is to focus on the appropriation and adaptation of fascist bodies of thought into various local contexts. This paper argues that in this context the studies in fascism from a transnational perspective can profit from by focusing on a contemporary understanding of fascism instead of a priori academic definitions. Harbin fascists perceived fascism as a universal idea, which assumed distinct manifestations depending on the particularities of each nation. Therefore in the view of contemporaries fascism also constituted a transnational movement. In a second step this paper reflects on the question to what extend fascist studies could also benefit from the extension from a transnational to a transcultural perspective to better grasp the diverse influences on various manifestation of fascism and deepen our understanding of change and entanglements between fascist movements as well as their respective environments on a global scale.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/journals/22116257/2/2/22116257_002_02_S002_text.html;jsessionid=F1Xfoq3Qn14tWQffkOyK97Of.x-brill-live-02?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/22116257-00202002&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/22116257-00202002
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/22116257-00202002
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/22116257-00202002
2013-01-01
2016-12-08

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation