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Full Access Counting Deviance: Revisiting a Decade’s Production of Surveys among Muslims in Western Europe

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Counting Deviance: Revisiting a Decade’s Production of Surveys among Muslims in Western Europe

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Abstract This article looks at the emergence of Muslims as a category of knowledge in surveys and opinion polls that have been conducted as a reaction to the rising demand for data about Muslim populations in Western Europe within the last ten years. The most prevalent feature of the conceptualization of Muslims is that they are inherently immigrants, or of immigrant descent, who are living within a certain nation state. This creates a continuous statistical invisibility of certain Muslims, for instance those without immigration backgrounds, as well as Muslims with national backgrounds other than Muslim majority countries. Further, this identification of the Muslim as immigrant, even if unintended, contributes to upholding a subtle exclusion of Muslims from the national community as always foreign and always potentially in need of integration.

Affiliations: 1: University of Copenhagen Denmark bjohansen@hum.ku.dk ; 2: University of Copenhagen Denmark rsp@teol.ku.dk

10.1163/221179512X644060
/content/journals/10.1163/221179512x644060
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
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Abstract This article looks at the emergence of Muslims as a category of knowledge in surveys and opinion polls that have been conducted as a reaction to the rising demand for data about Muslim populations in Western Europe within the last ten years. The most prevalent feature of the conceptualization of Muslims is that they are inherently immigrants, or of immigrant descent, who are living within a certain nation state. This creates a continuous statistical invisibility of certain Muslims, for instance those without immigration backgrounds, as well as Muslims with national backgrounds other than Muslim majority countries. Further, this identification of the Muslim as immigrant, even if unintended, contributes to upholding a subtle exclusion of Muslims from the national community as always foreign and always potentially in need of integration.

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/content/journals/10.1163/221179512x644060
2012-01-01
2016-12-09

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