Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Full Access Difficulties with Decentralization and Due Process

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Difficulties with Decentralization and Due Process

  • HTML
  • PDF
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

Indonesia’s Recent Experiences with International Investment Agreements and Investor-State Disputes

image of The Journal of World Investment & Trade

As a rapidly developing country, Indonesia realizes that foreign direct investment (FDI) remains necessary to fuel growth in the capital-scarce country. Yet, along with its development, Indonesia is facing more complex challenges both because of domestic issues and its problematic bilateral investment treaties (BITs) which do not provide explicit policy space for the government. The problematic implementation of the desentralisasi system, a limited rule of law and difficulties in dealing with corruption continue to reduce Indonesia’s attractiveness to foreign investors. Indonesia has decided to discontinue its old BITs and has expressed an interest in designing a new BIT model. This article attempts to suggest ways in which Indonesia can deal with its domestic challenges and to improve its new international investment agreements to create a more conducive investment climate.

Affiliations: 1: National University of Singapore, Singapore, james.losari@nus.edu.sg; 2: National University of Singapore, Singapore, michael.ewing-chow@nus.edu.sg

As a rapidly developing country, Indonesia realizes that foreign direct investment (FDI) remains necessary to fuel growth in the capital-scarce country. Yet, along with its development, Indonesia is facing more complex challenges both because of domestic issues and its problematic bilateral investment treaties (BITs) which do not provide explicit policy space for the government. The problematic implementation of the desentralisasi system, a limited rule of law and difficulties in dealing with corruption continue to reduce Indonesia’s attractiveness to foreign investors. Indonesia has decided to discontinue its old BITs and has expressed an interest in designing a new BIT model. This article attempts to suggest ways in which Indonesia can deal with its domestic challenges and to improve its new international investment agreements to create a more conducive investment climate.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/journals/22119000/16/5-6/22119000_016_05-06_S009_text.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/22119000-01606008&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/22119000-01606008
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/22119000-01606008
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/22119000-01606008
2015-11-13
2018-07-21

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation