Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Full Access Ezra as the Corrupter of the Torah? Re-Assessing Ibn Ḥazm’s Role in the Long History of an Idea

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Ezra as the Corrupter of the Torah? Re-Assessing Ibn Ḥazm’s Role in the Long History of an Idea

  • PDF
  • HTML
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Intellectual History of the Islamicate World

This article explores the originality, quality and influence on non-Muslims of a particular aspect of the work of the Andalusī Muslim Ibn Ḥazm (b. 384/994, d. 456/1064). The focus is the use of the motif of Ezra as corrupter of the Torah, and is examined by means of sustained engagement with the portrayal of Ibn Ḥazm by Hava Lazarus-Yafeh in her influential study, Intertwined Worlds. Building on but also questioning her work, the article examines positive and negative portrayals of Ezra, and explores possible Muslim predecessors of Ibn Ḥazm as a critic of Ezra. The originality and quality of Ibn Ḥazm’s work is questioned, through piecing together often familiar evidence so as to form a new picture of Ibn Ḥazm’s contribution. Lazarus-Yafeh’s suggestion that Ibn Ḥazm directly influenced non-Muslim thought, and therefore the rise of European sceptical Biblical scholarship, via the rabbi Ibn Ezra (b. 1094. d. c. 1167), is also shown to be unlikely.

Affiliations: 1: Centre for Muslim-Christian Studies, Oxford, and Regent’s Park College, Oxford m.whittingham@cmcsoxford.org.uk

10.1163/2212943X-20130111
/content/journals/10.1163/2212943x-20130111
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
6
3
Loading

This article explores the originality, quality and influence on non-Muslims of a particular aspect of the work of the Andalusī Muslim Ibn Ḥazm (b. 384/994, d. 456/1064). The focus is the use of the motif of Ezra as corrupter of the Torah, and is examined by means of sustained engagement with the portrayal of Ibn Ḥazm by Hava Lazarus-Yafeh in her influential study, Intertwined Worlds. Building on but also questioning her work, the article examines positive and negative portrayals of Ezra, and explores possible Muslim predecessors of Ibn Ḥazm as a critic of Ezra. The originality and quality of Ibn Ḥazm’s work is questioned, through piecing together often familiar evidence so as to form a new picture of Ibn Ḥazm’s contribution. Lazarus-Yafeh’s suggestion that Ibn Ḥazm directly influenced non-Muslim thought, and therefore the rise of European sceptical Biblical scholarship, via the rabbi Ibn Ezra (b. 1094. d. c. 1167), is also shown to be unlikely.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/2212943x/1/1-2/2212943X_001_01-02_S011_text.html;jsessionid=VwaUzRK9QaHy4HYvhAbVEMwU.x-brill-live-03?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/2212943x-20130111&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/2212943x-20130111
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/2212943x-20130111
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/2212943x-20130111
2013-01-01
2016-12-07

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Subscribe to Citation alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Intellectual History of the Islamicate World — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation