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Full Access Aulos and Harp: Questions of Pitch and Tonality

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Aulos and Harp: Questions of Pitch and Tonality

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Abstract This study addresses the question of pitches and pitch structures that may have been played on the excavated instruments, assessing string lengths and their implications as well as searching for a plausible effective length for the aulos including its reed, based on computer-modelling the behaviour of the oscillating air column. The results are discussed in the context of our present knowledge about pitch ranges that were typically used in ancient music.

Affiliations: 1: Institute for the Study of Ancient Culture Austrian Academy of Sciences Sonnenfelsgasse 19, 1010 Vienna Austria stefan.hagel@oeaw.ac.at

10.1163/22129758-12341241
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Abstract This study addresses the question of pitches and pitch structures that may have been played on the excavated instruments, assessing string lengths and their implications as well as searching for a plausible effective length for the aulos including its reed, based on computer-modelling the behaviour of the oscillating air column. The results are discussed in the context of our present knowledge about pitch ranges that were typically used in ancient music.

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/content/journals/10.1163/22129758-12341241
2013-01-01
2016-12-09

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