Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Open Access Why Do Balinese Make Offerings?

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Why Do Balinese Make Offerings?

  • HTML
  • PDF
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

On Religion, Teleology and Complexity

This article attempts to answer the question as to why Balinese make offerings. Eschewing an explanation in terms of a unitary religious or cultural belief, it explores the practices surrounding the preparation and dedication of banten (the Balinese term most commonly glossed in English as ‘offerings’), and how these practices embody conflicting articulations of agency, community and the common good. Analysis is directed to highlighting this complexity, while at the same time trying to avoid some of the difficulties and misleading reifications that come with the language of ‘syncretism’, ‘hybridity’, ‘great and little traditions’, and the like.

Affiliations: 1: Institut für Ethnologie, Ruprecht-Karls Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany rfox@eth.uni-heidelberg.de

10.1163/22134379-17101003
/content/journals/10.1163/22134379-17101003
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
10
5
Loading

This article attempts to answer the question as to why Balinese make offerings. Eschewing an explanation in terms of a unitary religious or cultural belief, it explores the practices surrounding the preparation and dedication of banten (the Balinese term most commonly glossed in English as ‘offerings’), and how these practices embody conflicting articulations of agency, community and the common good. Analysis is directed to highlighting this complexity, while at the same time trying to avoid some of the difficulties and misleading reifications that come with the language of ‘syncretism’, ‘hybridity’, ‘great and little traditions’, and the like.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/journals/22134379/171/1/22134379_171_01_s002_text.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/22134379-17101003&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/22134379-17101003
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/22134379-17101003
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/22134379-17101003
2015-01-01
2017-11-22

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Subscribe to Citation alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Bijdragen tot de taal-, land- en volkenkunde / Journal of the Humanities and Social Sciences of Southeast Asia — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation