Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Open Access Mobilizing the Masses

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Mobilizing the Masses

  • PDF
  • HTML
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

Street Vendors, Political Contracts, and the Role of Mediators in Yogyakarta, Indonesia

This article explores how a major street vendor organization, APKLI, negotiated its political agency during the New Order and post-Soeharto eras in Indonesia. Tracing the formation of the organization to its current existence, the article argues that APKLI has relied on mediators—both street vendor leaders and others with close ties to the state, other organizations, and/or political parties—to negotiate for street vendors’ recognition and support. It then describes how APKLI National sought to engage in electoral populism during the 2014 presidential election by promising to support a particular candidate in exchange for greater recognition and protection of street vendors. We argue that despite APKLI’s attempt to generate an ‘imagined community’ (Anderson 1983) of street vendors across the archipelago, many of its own district branches as well as individual street vendors supported local patrons who would more directly influence their immediate future. Others did not want to support a single political party, and preferred to maintain a neutral stance.

Affiliations: 1: Wilfrid Laurier University sgibbings@wlu.ca ; 2: Universitas Gadjah Mada elan.lazuardi@ugm.ac.id ; 3: Universitas Gadjah Mada khidir.marsanto.p@mail.ugm.ac.id

10.1163/22134379-17301004
/content/journals/10.1163/22134379-17301004
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
10
5
Loading

This article explores how a major street vendor organization, APKLI, negotiated its political agency during the New Order and post-Soeharto eras in Indonesia. Tracing the formation of the organization to its current existence, the article argues that APKLI has relied on mediators—both street vendor leaders and others with close ties to the state, other organizations, and/or political parties—to negotiate for street vendors’ recognition and support. It then describes how APKLI National sought to engage in electoral populism during the 2014 presidential election by promising to support a particular candidate in exchange for greater recognition and protection of street vendors. We argue that despite APKLI’s attempt to generate an ‘imagined community’ (Anderson 1983) of street vendors across the archipelago, many of its own district branches as well as individual street vendors supported local patrons who would more directly influence their immediate future. Others did not want to support a single political party, and preferred to maintain a neutral stance.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/journals/22134379/173/2-3/22134379_173_02-03_s004_text.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/22134379-17301004&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/22134379-17301004
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/22134379-17301004
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/22134379-17301004
2017-01-01
2017-11-18

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Subscribe to Citation alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Bijdragen tot de taal-, land- en volkenkunde / Journal of the Humanities and Social Sciences of Southeast Asia — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation