Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Full Access Writing More and Less ‘Jewishly’ in Judezmo and Yiddish

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Writing More and Less ‘Jewishly’ in Judezmo and Yiddish

  • PDF
  • HTML
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Journal of Jewish Languages

Abstract Max Weinreich used the term yídishlekh to describe the traditional, ‘Jewishly patterned’ style of writing in Yiddish. Weinreich illustrated this style by comparing Mendele Moykher Sforim’s ‘Jewishly-styled’ 1884 Yiddish translation of Leo Pinsker’s Autoemanzipation (Berlin 1882) with the original German-language text. The present article demonstrates that in Judezmo as well as Yiddish, writers have consciously used ‘Jewish styling,’ and its converse, in the diverse literary genres they cultivated from the Middle Ages into the early twentieth century. However, as a result of somewhat divergent social, political, and ideological trends in the Judezmo as opposed to Yiddish speech communities later in the twentieth century, Yiddish writers today prefer to incorporate features of ‘Jewish styling’ in their writing, while Judezmo writers tend to reject them.

Affiliations: 1: The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Jerusalem Israel

10.1163/22134638-12340005
/content/journals/10.1163/22134638-12340005
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
6
3
Loading

Abstract Max Weinreich used the term yídishlekh to describe the traditional, ‘Jewishly patterned’ style of writing in Yiddish. Weinreich illustrated this style by comparing Mendele Moykher Sforim’s ‘Jewishly-styled’ 1884 Yiddish translation of Leo Pinsker’s Autoemanzipation (Berlin 1882) with the original German-language text. The present article demonstrates that in Judezmo as well as Yiddish, writers have consciously used ‘Jewish styling,’ and its converse, in the diverse literary genres they cultivated from the Middle Ages into the early twentieth century. However, as a result of somewhat divergent social, political, and ideological trends in the Judezmo as opposed to Yiddish speech communities later in the twentieth century, Yiddish writers today prefer to incorporate features of ‘Jewish styling’ in their writing, while Judezmo writers tend to reject them.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/22134638/1/1/22134638_001_01_S03_text.html;jsessionid=TTqcPrHqHJ7TG56oY4ML37gJ.x-brill-live-03?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/22134638-12340005&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/22134638-12340005
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/22134638-12340005
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/22134638-12340005
2013-01-01
2016-12-06

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation