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Full Access Separate Presentation of Additional Accelerating Motion Does not Enhance Visually Induced Self-Motion Perception

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Separate Presentation of Additional Accelerating Motion Does not Enhance Visually Induced Self-Motion Perception

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It has been repeatedly reported that visual stimuli containing a jittering/oscillating motion component can induce self-motion perception more strongly than a pure radial expansion pattern. A psychophysical experiment with 11 observers revealed that the additional accelerating components of the visual motion have to be convoluted with the motion of the main-axis to facilitate self-motion perception; additional motion presented in an isolated fashion impairs the perception of self-motion. These results are inconsistent with a simple hypothesis about the perceptual mechanism underlying the advantage of jitter/oscillation, which assumes that the accelerating component induces an additional self-motion independently of the main motion at the first stage, and then the two self-motions induced by the main motion and the additional component become integrated.

Affiliations: 1: Faculty of Child Development, Nihon Fukushi University, Okuda, Mihama-cho, Aichi 470-3295, Japan

It has been repeatedly reported that visual stimuli containing a jittering/oscillating motion component can induce self-motion perception more strongly than a pure radial expansion pattern. A psychophysical experiment with 11 observers revealed that the additional accelerating components of the visual motion have to be convoluted with the motion of the main-axis to facilitate self-motion perception; additional motion presented in an isolated fashion impairs the perception of self-motion. These results are inconsistent with a simple hypothesis about the perceptual mechanism underlying the advantage of jitter/oscillation, which assumes that the accelerating component induces an additional self-motion independently of the main motion at the first stage, and then the two self-motions induced by the main motion and the additional component become integrated.

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/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-00002410
2013-01-01
2016-12-03

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