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Full Access Modeling body posture effects on reference frame integration

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Modeling body posture effects on reference frame integration

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To optimally estimate the location of a stimulus, the brain integrates spatial information from different senses. For such integration, spatial information available in modality-specific reference frames must be transformed into a common reference frame. For example, touch is remapped from skin-based, anatomical coordinates into an external, visual reference frame. Touch remapping is usually investigated by setting anatomical and external coordinates into conflict. For example, many studies have used temporal order judgments (TOJ) of tactile stimuli, for which performance is markedly impaired when the hands are crossed. Here, we show that crossing effects are not a peculiarity of the TOJ task, and demonstrate crossing effects in several tactile localization tasks. The size of the crossing effect was strongly related across tasks within participants, suggesting that crossing effects in different tasks originated from a common process. Furthermore, crossing effects were systematically modulated by both bottom-up and top-down features. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the data from all investigated tasks can be accounted for by a generative, probabilistic model of touch localization. The core feature of this model is the estimation of stimulus location by a weighted combination of the different reference frames. This result argues against the idea that crossing effects may be due to failures of the remapping calculations from skin to external space. Rather, the model suggests that crossing effects are a result of the brain’s attempt to integrate every available piece of information, independent of current posture.

Affiliations: 1: Biological Psychology and Neuropsychology, University of Hamburg, Germany

To optimally estimate the location of a stimulus, the brain integrates spatial information from different senses. For such integration, spatial information available in modality-specific reference frames must be transformed into a common reference frame. For example, touch is remapped from skin-based, anatomical coordinates into an external, visual reference frame. Touch remapping is usually investigated by setting anatomical and external coordinates into conflict. For example, many studies have used temporal order judgments (TOJ) of tactile stimuli, for which performance is markedly impaired when the hands are crossed. Here, we show that crossing effects are not a peculiarity of the TOJ task, and demonstrate crossing effects in several tactile localization tasks. The size of the crossing effect was strongly related across tasks within participants, suggesting that crossing effects in different tasks originated from a common process. Furthermore, crossing effects were systematically modulated by both bottom-up and top-down features. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the data from all investigated tasks can be accounted for by a generative, probabilistic model of touch localization. The core feature of this model is the estimation of stimulus location by a weighted combination of the different reference frames. This result argues against the idea that crossing effects may be due to failures of the remapping calculations from skin to external space. Rather, the model suggests that crossing effects are a result of the brain’s attempt to integrate every available piece of information, independent of current posture.

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/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0003
2013-05-16
2016-12-10

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