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Full Access Where tactile signals are ordered in time

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Where tactile signals are ordered in time

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We previously found that crossing the arms caused misreporting of the temporal order of successive tactile stimuli, delivered one to each hand (Yamamoto and Kitazawa, 2001). From the results, we suggested that it is not until the tactile signals are localized in space that the signals are ordered in time. It is now generally accepted that a tactile stimulus delivered to a hand is initially mapped to the wrong hand, and then remapped to the correct hand, when the arms are crossed. This idea derived from a phenomenon termed ‘curved somatosensory saccade’ (Groh and Sparks, 1996; Overvliet et al., 2011). We hypothesized that (1) an ‘inverted’ motion vector is generated from the wrong mapping of the first stimulus to the wrong mapping of the second stimulus, and (2) reversal occurs because the order of tactile events are reconstructed by combining information regarding ‘what happened where’ and information regarding ‘when’, captured in an inverted motion vector (Takahashi et al., 2012). We provide evidence that supports the ‘motion projection’ hypothesis, and show that the process including remapping takes place in areas that receive converging inputs from tactile, proprioceptive, and visual modalities, as well as corollary discharges of saccade control signals.

Affiliations: 1: Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, Osaka University, Japan

We previously found that crossing the arms caused misreporting of the temporal order of successive tactile stimuli, delivered one to each hand (Yamamoto and Kitazawa, 2001). From the results, we suggested that it is not until the tactile signals are localized in space that the signals are ordered in time. It is now generally accepted that a tactile stimulus delivered to a hand is initially mapped to the wrong hand, and then remapped to the correct hand, when the arms are crossed. This idea derived from a phenomenon termed ‘curved somatosensory saccade’ (Groh and Sparks, 1996; Overvliet et al., 2011). We hypothesized that (1) an ‘inverted’ motion vector is generated from the wrong mapping of the first stimulus to the wrong mapping of the second stimulus, and (2) reversal occurs because the order of tactile events are reconstructed by combining information regarding ‘what happened where’ and information regarding ‘when’, captured in an inverted motion vector (Takahashi et al., 2012). We provide evidence that supports the ‘motion projection’ hypothesis, and show that the process including remapping takes place in areas that receive converging inputs from tactile, proprioceptive, and visual modalities, as well as corollary discharges of saccade control signals.

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/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0005
2013-05-16
2017-05-26

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