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Full Access Representing hands in the brain and effects of viewing hands on temporal synchrony perception

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Representing hands in the brain and effects of viewing hands on temporal synchrony perception

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image of Multisensory Research
For more content, see Seeing and Perceiving and Spatial Vision.

Previous research has shown that specific occipitotemporal areas process visual information of specific body parts such as hands. We used an fMRI block-design to investigate if anterior intraparietal and ventral premotor areas that have been shown to selectively process hand-related synchronous multisensory information also exhibit selective responses to visual hand information. Our findings suggest that both anterior intraparietal and occipitotemporal areas encode visual hand shape and orientation information. Furthermore, we investigated whether visual hand information modulates temporal synchrony perception. We used a virtual hand setup that includes a glove-based motion capture system (CyberGlove Systems). Participants were asked to perform finger flexion movements and viewed a virtual hand or object performing the same movement. We manipulated the onset delay between the performed and viewed movements and used a two-interval forced choice task to study delay detection performance. Our results indicate that visual spatial hand information modulates the perceptual sensitivity of temporal relationships between self-movements and viewed movements.

Affiliations: 1: 1Department of Cognitive Science, Macquarie University, Australia; 2: 2Department of Physical Therapy, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Previous research has shown that specific occipitotemporal areas process visual information of specific body parts such as hands. We used an fMRI block-design to investigate if anterior intraparietal and ventral premotor areas that have been shown to selectively process hand-related synchronous multisensory information also exhibit selective responses to visual hand information. Our findings suggest that both anterior intraparietal and occipitotemporal areas encode visual hand shape and orientation information. Furthermore, we investigated whether visual hand information modulates temporal synchrony perception. We used a virtual hand setup that includes a glove-based motion capture system (CyberGlove Systems). Participants were asked to perform finger flexion movements and viewed a virtual hand or object performing the same movement. We manipulated the onset delay between the performed and viewed movements and used a two-interval forced choice task to study delay detection performance. Our results indicate that visual spatial hand information modulates the perceptual sensitivity of temporal relationships between self-movements and viewed movements.

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/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0019
2013-05-16
2016-12-10

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