Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Full Access Cross-modal plasticity in the congenitally deaf cat

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Cross-modal plasticity in the congenitally deaf cat

  • HTML
  • PDF
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Multisensory Research
For more content, see Seeing and Perceiving and Spatial Vision.

The experiments were undertaken on 8 cats (4 deaf, 4 hearing), recordings were from dorsal auditory cortex (field DZ) and an adjoining visual field (PMLS) under cochlear implant (auditory) and visual stimulation in light isoflurane/N2O anesthesia (Land et al., 2012, PLoS One). Visual stimuli were flashes (increasing and decreasing luminance) phase-reversal gratings with different orientations and spatial frequencies. Simultaneous recordings were taken using two 16-channel Neuronexus probes inserted at ∼10 positions in both fields spatially as close as possible. The DZ penetration had an orientation parallel to the microcolumns. Electrodes were stained with DiI or DiO and the penetrations were histologically reconstructed after the experiment. Recording sites within DZ were confirmed using an SMI-32 staining. From all recording sites, only the sites containing unit activity were processed further. Altogether, 1424 unit responses were evaluated, ∼700 in each group. Spontaneous activity was significantly higher in PMLS than in DZ in both groups of animals. Unit responses showing statistically significant correlation with current level were considered responsive to auditory stimulation. There were significant auditory responses in both groups of animals in DZ (deaf: 29%; hearing: 36% of sites). In PMLS, only few units responded to auditory stimulation (deaf: 2%; hearing: 4%). Visual stimulation led to responses in one third of units in PMLS in both groups of animals (deaf: 31%; hearing: 29%). In DZ, on the other hand, the deaf cats had more visual responses (deaf: 7%; hearing: 2%). In these responsive units, the evoked firing rate was higher in deaf cats, whereas hearing cats demonstrated more a modulation of ongoing activity than an evoked response in DZ. Only few bimodal units responsive to both auditory and visual stimulation were observed in DZ of deaf cats. The present results suggest a modest visual cross-modal reorganization of field DZ in congenital deafness. However, the auditory responsiveness was preserved in this field, too. The relatively small number of visually-responsive cells, corresponding to previous tracer studies (Barone et al., 2013, PLoS One), demonstrates that also other (possibly attentional) processes are involved in supranormal visual performance of deaf subjects.

Affiliations: 1: 1Institute of Audioneurotechnology & Dept. of Experimental Otology, ENT Clinics, Hannover School of Medicine, Hannover, Germany; 2: 2Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, School of Medicine, University of Western Ontario, Canada

The experiments were undertaken on 8 cats (4 deaf, 4 hearing), recordings were from dorsal auditory cortex (field DZ) and an adjoining visual field (PMLS) under cochlear implant (auditory) and visual stimulation in light isoflurane/N2O anesthesia (Land et al., 2012, PLoS One). Visual stimuli were flashes (increasing and decreasing luminance) phase-reversal gratings with different orientations and spatial frequencies. Simultaneous recordings were taken using two 16-channel Neuronexus probes inserted at ∼10 positions in both fields spatially as close as possible. The DZ penetration had an orientation parallel to the microcolumns. Electrodes were stained with DiI or DiO and the penetrations were histologically reconstructed after the experiment. Recording sites within DZ were confirmed using an SMI-32 staining. From all recording sites, only the sites containing unit activity were processed further. Altogether, 1424 unit responses were evaluated, ∼700 in each group. Spontaneous activity was significantly higher in PMLS than in DZ in both groups of animals. Unit responses showing statistically significant correlation with current level were considered responsive to auditory stimulation. There were significant auditory responses in both groups of animals in DZ (deaf: 29%; hearing: 36% of sites). In PMLS, only few units responded to auditory stimulation (deaf: 2%; hearing: 4%). Visual stimulation led to responses in one third of units in PMLS in both groups of animals (deaf: 31%; hearing: 29%). In DZ, on the other hand, the deaf cats had more visual responses (deaf: 7%; hearing: 2%). In these responsive units, the evoked firing rate was higher in deaf cats, whereas hearing cats demonstrated more a modulation of ongoing activity than an evoked response in DZ. Only few bimodal units responsive to both auditory and visual stimulation were observed in DZ of deaf cats. The present results suggest a modest visual cross-modal reorganization of field DZ in congenital deafness. However, the auditory responsiveness was preserved in this field, too. The relatively small number of visually-responsive cells, corresponding to previous tracer studies (Barone et al., 2013, PLoS One), demonstrates that also other (possibly attentional) processes are involved in supranormal visual performance of deaf subjects.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/22134808/26/10/22134808_026_00_S22_text.html;jsessionid=nRoWx5BWp8kBV3oSZiAa5znX.x-brill-live-03?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0022&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0022
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0022
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0022
2013-05-16
2016-12-09

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation