Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Full Access Audio-visual temporal recalibration in cluttered displays

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Audio-visual temporal recalibration in cluttered displays

  • HTML
  • PDF
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Multisensory Research
For more content, see Seeing and Perceiving and Spatial Vision.

Previous demonstrations of temporal recalibration have used single audiovisual events. Natural environments, however, are often highly cluttered both spatially and temporally. We investigated recalibration in highly cluttered visual scenes, examining to what extent it is retinotopically specific. Each trial consisted of an adaptation phase, where participants were exposed to 0.7 Hz square-wave amplitude modulating 500 Hz pure tone and luminance-defined disk (0.7 Hz) for 60 s; and a test phase. We manipulated the relative phase of the adapting tone and disk, corresponding to A-V SOAs of −106, 0 and +106 ms, and the location of the adapting disk stimulus (at fixation vs. 14° to the right of fixation). The test stimulus consisted of 20 luminance-defined disks concentrically arranged around fixation (14° radius). The tone and luminance of each disk modulated abruptly (0.7 Hz). Each disk was presented at a unique temporal phase with each temporally adjacent pair separated by 40 ms. On each trial, the phase of one disk matched that of the tone modulation. Critically, the temporal phase associated with each disk location varied randomly from trial-to-trial and it was the subjects’ task to identify the synchronized disk. We measured the proportion of trials for which a given disk was chosen as being synchronous. Shifts in PSS of ∼ − 50  ms were observed following tone-first adaptation and ∼ + 120  ms following flash-first adaptation. Visual quadrant analysis revealed no differences in the PSS shifts following foveal and peripheral adaptation. We conclude that recalibration may be amplified by the presence of spatio-temporal visual clutter, and this is unconstrained by the location of adapting stimuli.

Affiliations: 1: 1School of Psychology, University of Western Sydney, Australia; 2: 2School of Psychology, University of Sydney, Australia

Previous demonstrations of temporal recalibration have used single audiovisual events. Natural environments, however, are often highly cluttered both spatially and temporally. We investigated recalibration in highly cluttered visual scenes, examining to what extent it is retinotopically specific. Each trial consisted of an adaptation phase, where participants were exposed to 0.7 Hz square-wave amplitude modulating 500 Hz pure tone and luminance-defined disk (0.7 Hz) for 60 s; and a test phase. We manipulated the relative phase of the adapting tone and disk, corresponding to A-V SOAs of −106, 0 and +106 ms, and the location of the adapting disk stimulus (at fixation vs. 14° to the right of fixation). The test stimulus consisted of 20 luminance-defined disks concentrically arranged around fixation (14° radius). The tone and luminance of each disk modulated abruptly (0.7 Hz). Each disk was presented at a unique temporal phase with each temporally adjacent pair separated by 40 ms. On each trial, the phase of one disk matched that of the tone modulation. Critically, the temporal phase associated with each disk location varied randomly from trial-to-trial and it was the subjects’ task to identify the synchronized disk. We measured the proportion of trials for which a given disk was chosen as being synchronous. Shifts in PSS of ∼ − 50  ms were observed following tone-first adaptation and ∼ + 120  ms following flash-first adaptation. Visual quadrant analysis revealed no differences in the PSS shifts following foveal and peripheral adaptation. We conclude that recalibration may be amplified by the presence of spatio-temporal visual clutter, and this is unconstrained by the location of adapting stimuli.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/22134808/26/10/22134808_026_00_S29_text.html;jsessionid=OEfX9iT0qBwrzdTEnsUhnbB8.x-brill-live-03?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0029&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0029
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0029
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0029
2013-05-16
2016-12-10

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation