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Full Access Cross-modal temporal frequency channels for rate classification

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Cross-modal temporal frequency channels for rate classification

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We previously reported our discovery that temporal rate adaptation transfers bidirectionally between vision and audition. Temporal frequency channels are linked across audition and vision (Yao et al., 2009); but duration channels for audition and vision are thought to be independent (Heron et al., 2012). We used our paradigm to characterize linkages between auditory and visual channels by measuring whether or not transfer of adaptation still occurs as the discrepancy between adaptation and test frequencies increases. Participants ran in three experimental sessions, each with a different adaptation frequency. They were trained, using feedback, to classify flickering visual stimuli (ranging in frequency from 3.25–4.75 Hz) as fast or slow (relative to 4 Hz). They then classified 140 pre-adaptation test trials with feedback, providing a baseline. Afterwards, 30 adaptation trials of auditory stimuli beeping at either 5, 8, or 12 Hz were presented, followed by 20 alternating blocks of 7 adaptation and 7 post-adaptation test trials (without feedback). We compared the PSE of the pre- and post-adaptation trials to quantify the cross-modal transfer and found that the aftereffect occurred when the adaptation frequency was most similar to the test frequencies but was no longer present with larger discrepancies. These results rule out response bias as a plausible explanation for our original findings and suggest that the timing mechanisms underlying rate perception are consistent with supramodal channels that are tuned.

Affiliations: 1: 1Cognitive Science Program, Occidental College, USA; 2: 2Computation and Neural Systems Program, California Institute of Technology, USA

We previously reported our discovery that temporal rate adaptation transfers bidirectionally between vision and audition. Temporal frequency channels are linked across audition and vision (Yao et al., 2009); but duration channels for audition and vision are thought to be independent (Heron et al., 2012). We used our paradigm to characterize linkages between auditory and visual channels by measuring whether or not transfer of adaptation still occurs as the discrepancy between adaptation and test frequencies increases. Participants ran in three experimental sessions, each with a different adaptation frequency. They were trained, using feedback, to classify flickering visual stimuli (ranging in frequency from 3.25–4.75 Hz) as fast or slow (relative to 4 Hz). They then classified 140 pre-adaptation test trials with feedback, providing a baseline. Afterwards, 30 adaptation trials of auditory stimuli beeping at either 5, 8, or 12 Hz were presented, followed by 20 alternating blocks of 7 adaptation and 7 post-adaptation test trials (without feedback). We compared the PSE of the pre- and post-adaptation trials to quantify the cross-modal transfer and found that the aftereffect occurred when the adaptation frequency was most similar to the test frequencies but was no longer present with larger discrepancies. These results rule out response bias as a plausible explanation for our original findings and suggest that the timing mechanisms underlying rate perception are consistent with supramodal channels that are tuned.

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/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0031
2013-05-16
2017-05-29

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