Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Full Access Pre-attentive processing of audition and touch: A high-density electrical mapping study of multisensory mismatch negativity

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Pre-attentive processing of audition and touch: A high-density electrical mapping study of multisensory mismatch negativity

  • PDF
  • HTML
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Multisensory Research
For more content, see Seeing and Perceiving and Spatial Vision.

Human and animal neurophysiological studies have shown that the auditory and tactile systems interact both early in time, and early in the cortical processing hierarchy. The question remains as to the functional significance of these multisensory interactions that are observed prior to 100 ms post-stimulus onset in both auditory and tactile cortices. We sought to test the hypothesis that this cross-talk occurs during preattentive sensory processing. The mismatch negativity (MMN), an electrophysiological response associated with the pre-attentive detection of a change within the context of a regular pattern of stimulation, served as the dependent measure. High-density electrophysiological recordings were made in healthy adults who viewed a silent movie while they were presented a stream of blocked tactile, auditory or audio-tactile stimuli consisting of frequent and infrequent stimuli. The mismatch waveforms were calculated by subtracting the frequent from the infrequent evoked potential. In Experiment 1 and 2, we investigated the cross sensory interactions to duration and frequency change, respectively. For both experiments we measure tactile, auditory and audio-tactile MMN. The scalp data showed fronto-central negative topographies for both the frequency and duration multisensory MMNs, which is typical of auditory alone mismatches. Cross-sensory interactions between the sensory channels were assessed by testing for non-linearity of the multisensory MMNs when compared to the sum of the unisensory MMNs. In the duration change paradigm the multisensory mismatch showed no cross sensory interaction between audition and touch, suggesting that duration is processed in sensory specific cortices. In contrast, in the frequency change paradigm the multisensory mismatch exhibited non-linear interactions beginning at ∼180 ms, and was consistent with preattentive cross-talk among the tactile and auditory temporal frequency processing streams. Our results suggest that different networks might underlie the processing of duration whereas there is cross-sensory interaction at the sensory perceptual level of audition and tactile for frequency processing.

Affiliations: 1: The Sheryl and Daniel R. Tishman Cognitive Neurophysiology Laboratory, Department of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA

Human and animal neurophysiological studies have shown that the auditory and tactile systems interact both early in time, and early in the cortical processing hierarchy. The question remains as to the functional significance of these multisensory interactions that are observed prior to 100 ms post-stimulus onset in both auditory and tactile cortices. We sought to test the hypothesis that this cross-talk occurs during preattentive sensory processing. The mismatch negativity (MMN), an electrophysiological response associated with the pre-attentive detection of a change within the context of a regular pattern of stimulation, served as the dependent measure. High-density electrophysiological recordings were made in healthy adults who viewed a silent movie while they were presented a stream of blocked tactile, auditory or audio-tactile stimuli consisting of frequent and infrequent stimuli. The mismatch waveforms were calculated by subtracting the frequent from the infrequent evoked potential. In Experiment 1 and 2, we investigated the cross sensory interactions to duration and frequency change, respectively. For both experiments we measure tactile, auditory and audio-tactile MMN. The scalp data showed fronto-central negative topographies for both the frequency and duration multisensory MMNs, which is typical of auditory alone mismatches. Cross-sensory interactions between the sensory channels were assessed by testing for non-linearity of the multisensory MMNs when compared to the sum of the unisensory MMNs. In the duration change paradigm the multisensory mismatch showed no cross sensory interaction between audition and touch, suggesting that duration is processed in sensory specific cortices. In contrast, in the frequency change paradigm the multisensory mismatch exhibited non-linear interactions beginning at ∼180 ms, and was consistent with preattentive cross-talk among the tactile and auditory temporal frequency processing streams. Our results suggest that different networks might underlie the processing of duration whereas there is cross-sensory interaction at the sensory perceptual level of audition and tactile for frequency processing.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/22134808/26/10/22134808_026_00_S46_text.html;jsessionid=HCiy1trQd3ZrlPK5tGjCgHwv.x-brill-live-03?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0046&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0046
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0046
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0046
2013-05-16
2016-12-03

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation