Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Full Access Audio-tactile crossmodal correspondences

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Audio-tactile crossmodal correspondences

  • PDF
  • HTML
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Multisensory Research
For more content, see Seeing and Perceiving and Spatial Vision.

We investigated some spontaneous crossmodal correspondences between audition and touch both in blind and sighted people. In four experiments, we tested the interactions between the direction of tactile movement (proximal–distal vs. distal–proximal movement on the fingertip) and change in auditory frequency (increasing vs. decreasing pitch). We measured the compatibility effect between congruent stimuli (proximal–distal tactile movements and increasing pitch, or distal–proximal tactile movement and decreasing pitch) and incongruent stimuli (i.e., the reverse association). The selective attention method, commonly used to test crossmodal correspondences, requires participants to focus on tactile or auditory signals while ignoring the other one presented simultaneously. The results with this method did not reveal any significant compatibility effect. However, a variant of the implicit association task (IAT, e.g., Parise and Spence, 2012) that relies on associations in the response buttons did reveal a significant compatibility effect. This effect was similar in the conditions where the arm was placed vertically and horizontally, that is whether or not the distal–proximal tactile movement corresponded to the free movement of an object subjected to gravity. Finally, in the IAT protocol, similar effects were obtained in blind and in sighted people, i.e., a crossmodal correspondence effect was obtained independently of the arm’s position. These results have methodological implications for the testing of crossmodal correspondences and for the design of sensory substitution devices. They indeed demonstrate the relevance of using spontaneous crossmodal correspondences, and not just arbitrary associations, in order to code aspects of the original signals in conversion systems for blind people.

Affiliations: 1: 1Centre for the Study of the Senses, University of London, UK; 2: 2ISIR, CNRS UMR 7222, France; 3: 3LIMSI, CNRS UPR 3251, France

We investigated some spontaneous crossmodal correspondences between audition and touch both in blind and sighted people. In four experiments, we tested the interactions between the direction of tactile movement (proximal–distal vs. distal–proximal movement on the fingertip) and change in auditory frequency (increasing vs. decreasing pitch). We measured the compatibility effect between congruent stimuli (proximal–distal tactile movements and increasing pitch, or distal–proximal tactile movement and decreasing pitch) and incongruent stimuli (i.e., the reverse association). The selective attention method, commonly used to test crossmodal correspondences, requires participants to focus on tactile or auditory signals while ignoring the other one presented simultaneously. The results with this method did not reveal any significant compatibility effect. However, a variant of the implicit association task (IAT, e.g., Parise and Spence, 2012) that relies on associations in the response buttons did reveal a significant compatibility effect. This effect was similar in the conditions where the arm was placed vertically and horizontally, that is whether or not the distal–proximal tactile movement corresponded to the free movement of an object subjected to gravity. Finally, in the IAT protocol, similar effects were obtained in blind and in sighted people, i.e., a crossmodal correspondence effect was obtained independently of the arm’s position. These results have methodological implications for the testing of crossmodal correspondences and for the design of sensory substitution devices. They indeed demonstrate the relevance of using spontaneous crossmodal correspondences, and not just arbitrary associations, in order to code aspects of the original signals in conversion systems for blind people.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/22134808/26/10/22134808_026_00_S49_text.html;jsessionid=St7uNiwEuc7GCS3uQoEWGwyx.x-brill-live-02?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0049&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0049
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0049
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0049
2013-05-16
2016-12-09

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation