Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Full Access Minimum audible angle at the subjective front during listener’s head rotation

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Minimum audible angle at the subjective front during listener’s head rotation

  • HTML
  • PDF
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Multisensory Research
For more content, see Seeing and Perceiving and Spatial Vision.

Sound localization is a multisensory process consisting not only of hearing, but also of self-motion perception. A large number of studies have shown that the listener’s head movement, particularly horizontal rotation, effectively improves sound localization acuity (Wallach, 1939; Thurlow, 1967; Kawaura, 1989; etc.). However, research into sound localization during head rotation is scarce. Thus, the multisensory process underlying sound localization remains unclear. In the present study, we directly investigated the minimum audible angle (MAA) — the detection threshold needed for the listener to localize sounds at different positions — at the front during horizontal head rotation. A sound stimulus (30-ms noise burst) was presented from a loudspeaker of a circular array (r = 1.1 m), with a loudspeaker separation of 2.5 degrees. The listener, sitting at the center of the circle, was asked to answer whether the sound stimulus was presented from the left or right of the subjective front (2AFC). We considered two listening conditions, static and dynamic. In the static condition, listeners were asked to keep their heads still. Meanwhile, for the dynamic condition, listeners were asked to rapidly rotate their heads; the test stimulus was triggered during head movement. Sound stimuli were presented from a randomly selected loudspeaker out of a subset of 13 centered at the listener’s physical front at the time of stimulus presentation. Results showed the MAA to deteriorate significantly in the dynamic condition. This implies that the improvements in sound localization due to head motion could be explained by the multiple-look model (Viemeister and Wakefield, 1991).

Affiliations: 1: 1Research Institute of Electrical Communication and Graduate School of Information Sciences, Tohoku University, Japan; 2: 2Department of Welfare Psychology, Tohoku Fukushi University, Japan; 3: 3Faculty of Engineering, Tohoku Gakuin University, Japan

Sound localization is a multisensory process consisting not only of hearing, but also of self-motion perception. A large number of studies have shown that the listener’s head movement, particularly horizontal rotation, effectively improves sound localization acuity (Wallach, 1939; Thurlow, 1967; Kawaura, 1989; etc.). However, research into sound localization during head rotation is scarce. Thus, the multisensory process underlying sound localization remains unclear. In the present study, we directly investigated the minimum audible angle (MAA) — the detection threshold needed for the listener to localize sounds at different positions — at the front during horizontal head rotation. A sound stimulus (30-ms noise burst) was presented from a loudspeaker of a circular array (r = 1.1 m), with a loudspeaker separation of 2.5 degrees. The listener, sitting at the center of the circle, was asked to answer whether the sound stimulus was presented from the left or right of the subjective front (2AFC). We considered two listening conditions, static and dynamic. In the static condition, listeners were asked to keep their heads still. Meanwhile, for the dynamic condition, listeners were asked to rapidly rotate their heads; the test stimulus was triggered during head movement. Sound stimuli were presented from a randomly selected loudspeaker out of a subset of 13 centered at the listener’s physical front at the time of stimulus presentation. Results showed the MAA to deteriorate significantly in the dynamic condition. This implies that the improvements in sound localization due to head motion could be explained by the multiple-look model (Viemeister and Wakefield, 1991).

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/22134808/26/10/22134808_026_00_S75_text.html;jsessionid=fgX5WTjoqZKI-qZNv5GN-Ii4.x-brill-live-03?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0075&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0075
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0075
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0075
2013-05-16
2016-12-08

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation