Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Full Access Access to art: Different ways of looking

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access to art: Different ways of looking

  • PDF
  • HTML
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Multisensory Research
For more content, see Seeing and Perceiving and Spatial Vision.

The goal is wherever possible to remove or reduce physical, sensual, and Intellectual barriers to access and to ensure that all aspects of art galleries, exhibitions and activities are accessible as possible for adults and children with mild disabilities to profound and multiple learning disabilities (PMLD). In this presentation I will review the experience of the children while visiting at an exhibition and taking part of a creative session, being exposed to multi sensory (everyday life) props and using facilities, which are being adapted to their abilities. I will discuss the engagement of the children through sensory activities and/or stimulations placing with in the art context followed by questions raised in regarding to their perceptions and experiences of the artwork and/or activity. For children with PMLD taking part in an arts-based activity, a visit to the gallery goes beyond the art work and include the impact of new physical surroundings; echoes in different rooms is very exciting for some children and can prompt exceptional responses. New experiences, such as looking at a striking artwork, listening to a soundscape or making work, invite these children to respond directly to what they are seeing, hearing, smelling or doing. The experience facilitates new ways to communicate and can help the children to better understand the world around them. Fundamental to using creative arts to communicate with children with PMLD is the opportunity to develop a set of arts-related experiences that incorporate a range of senses; visual stimulations, temperature, touch and smell are all powerful ways to reach children who face a complex set of communication challenges.

Affiliations: 1: Royal Academy of Arts, Israel

The goal is wherever possible to remove or reduce physical, sensual, and Intellectual barriers to access and to ensure that all aspects of art galleries, exhibitions and activities are accessible as possible for adults and children with mild disabilities to profound and multiple learning disabilities (PMLD). In this presentation I will review the experience of the children while visiting at an exhibition and taking part of a creative session, being exposed to multi sensory (everyday life) props and using facilities, which are being adapted to their abilities. I will discuss the engagement of the children through sensory activities and/or stimulations placing with in the art context followed by questions raised in regarding to their perceptions and experiences of the artwork and/or activity. For children with PMLD taking part in an arts-based activity, a visit to the gallery goes beyond the art work and include the impact of new physical surroundings; echoes in different rooms is very exciting for some children and can prompt exceptional responses. New experiences, such as looking at a striking artwork, listening to a soundscape or making work, invite these children to respond directly to what they are seeing, hearing, smelling or doing. The experience facilitates new ways to communicate and can help the children to better understand the world around them. Fundamental to using creative arts to communicate with children with PMLD is the opportunity to develop a set of arts-related experiences that incorporate a range of senses; visual stimulations, temperature, touch and smell are all powerful ways to reach children who face a complex set of communication challenges.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/22134808/26/10/22134808_026_00_S107_text.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0107&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0107
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0107
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0107
2013-05-16
2017-07-26

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation