Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Full Access A body illusion by movements or by touch: Comparing different ways of inducing the rubber hand illusion

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

A body illusion by movements or by touch: Comparing different ways of inducing the rubber hand illusion

  • PDF
  • HTML
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Multisensory Research
For more content, see Seeing and Perceiving and Spatial Vision.

The rubber hand illusion is a bodily illusion where a model hand is experienced as part of the own body. The classical version of this illusion is based on synchronous visuo-tactile stimulation applied to the model in view and the person’s real real hand, which is hidden from view. However it has been also shown that the illusion can be induced by passive or active finger movements, without any tactile stimulation by an external object. In the present study participants experience active movements, passive movements and visuo-tactile stimulation of a model hand. Although these situations represent different combinations of sensory information, they all create a sense of ownership towards the model hand. This raises the question which of these combinations is most potent in eliciting the illusion. In particular one may ask if the combination of afferent and efferent signals in active movements would result in the same experience as passive visuo-tactile stimulation. We present data from subjective and objective measures of the illusion and show here that the illusion seems to be similar, regardless if it is induced by synchronized visuo-tactile stroking, active finger movements or passive finger movements. These observations show that different combinations of sensory input can all lead to a very similar phenomenological experience and exemplify again that the illusion can be induced by any combination of multisensory information, and not by a specific combination alone.

Affiliations: 1: Brain, Body and Self Laboratory, Dep. of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden

The rubber hand illusion is a bodily illusion where a model hand is experienced as part of the own body. The classical version of this illusion is based on synchronous visuo-tactile stimulation applied to the model in view and the person’s real real hand, which is hidden from view. However it has been also shown that the illusion can be induced by passive or active finger movements, without any tactile stimulation by an external object. In the present study participants experience active movements, passive movements and visuo-tactile stimulation of a model hand. Although these situations represent different combinations of sensory information, they all create a sense of ownership towards the model hand. This raises the question which of these combinations is most potent in eliciting the illusion. In particular one may ask if the combination of afferent and efferent signals in active movements would result in the same experience as passive visuo-tactile stimulation. We present data from subjective and objective measures of the illusion and show here that the illusion seems to be similar, regardless if it is induced by synchronized visuo-tactile stroking, active finger movements or passive finger movements. These observations show that different combinations of sensory input can all lead to a very similar phenomenological experience and exemplify again that the illusion can be induced by any combination of multisensory information, and not by a specific combination alone.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/22134808/26/10/22134808_026_00_S110_text.html;jsessionid=m0yHXZ6v5cNJ8zdkAYPiHhL1.x-brill-live-02?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0110&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0110
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0110
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0110
2013-05-16
2016-12-11

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation