Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Full Access A rhythmic deviation within a musical sequence induces neural activation in inferior parietal regions after short-term multisensory training

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

A rhythmic deviation within a musical sequence induces neural activation in inferior parietal regions after short-term multisensory training

  • PDF
  • HTML
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Multisensory Research
For more content, see Seeing and Perceiving and Spatial Vision.

The musical mismatch negativity in MEG represents the violation of a regularity in a musical sequence. It may be considered as a pre-attentive sensory change detection or as a top-down prediction error signal. Rhythmic and melodic deviations within a musical sequence elicit a stronger mismatch negativity in musically trained subjects than in novices indicating that acquired musical expertise leads to better discrimination accuracy of musical material and better predictions about upcoming musical events. Expectation violations to musical material could therefore recruit neural generators that reflect top-down processes that are based on musical knowledge. To investigate the neural generators of musical deviance detection after musical training with rhythmic material we localized musical mismatch data from a previous MEG study with beamformer analysis. The training material focused on rhythmic progression and the MEG measurements on rhythmic violations. The beamformer analysis revealed neural activation bilaterally within the vicinity of auditory cortices and in the inferior parietal lobule, in an area that has recently been implied in temporal processing. We suggest that the musical training that subjects had received prior to the MEG measurement, has established an internal forward model linking a piano tone with a specific motor movement. This internal forward model might have supported and improved predictions about the timing of upcoming tones. Expectation violations were than presumably processed in the parietal lobule where timing and the motor system are closely linked.

Affiliations: 1: 1Institute for Biomagnetism and Biosignalanalysis, University of Münster, Germany; 2: 2GSI Helmholzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt, Germany

The musical mismatch negativity in MEG represents the violation of a regularity in a musical sequence. It may be considered as a pre-attentive sensory change detection or as a top-down prediction error signal. Rhythmic and melodic deviations within a musical sequence elicit a stronger mismatch negativity in musically trained subjects than in novices indicating that acquired musical expertise leads to better discrimination accuracy of musical material and better predictions about upcoming musical events. Expectation violations to musical material could therefore recruit neural generators that reflect top-down processes that are based on musical knowledge. To investigate the neural generators of musical deviance detection after musical training with rhythmic material we localized musical mismatch data from a previous MEG study with beamformer analysis. The training material focused on rhythmic progression and the MEG measurements on rhythmic violations. The beamformer analysis revealed neural activation bilaterally within the vicinity of auditory cortices and in the inferior parietal lobule, in an area that has recently been implied in temporal processing. We suggest that the musical training that subjects had received prior to the MEG measurement, has established an internal forward model linking a piano tone with a specific motor movement. This internal forward model might have supported and improved predictions about the timing of upcoming tones. Expectation violations were than presumably processed in the parietal lobule where timing and the motor system are closely linked.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/22134808/26/10/22134808_026_00_S121_text.html;jsessionid=MCK9I5hUlnpiXbd1LUc3zNH9.x-brill-live-03?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0121&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0121
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0121
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0121
2013-05-16
2016-12-08

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation