Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Full Access Temporal expectancy selectively enhances audiovisual target detection

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Temporal expectancy selectively enhances audiovisual target detection

  • HTML
  • PDF
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Multisensory Research
For more content, see Seeing and Perceiving and Spatial Vision.

We investigated the effect of attending to a specific period in time on low-intensity target detection in two psychophysical experiments. In the first experiment, participants were asked to detect a deviant target within a regular distractor sequence. Five experimental conditions were used: in the auditory-only condition, the target was a frequency modulated tone presented in a train of 14 pure tone distractors. In the visual-only condition, the target was a Gabor patch with a higher contrast compared to Gabor distractors. In all three AV conditions, auditory and visual trains of distractors were presented simultaneously but each condition differed for target type (i.e.: auditory-only, visual-only or AV target). In the second experiment, participants performed a frequency-discrimination instead of simple detection task. In both experiments, the target could appear either after a short or a long interval (400 or 1400 ms after first stimulus onset, respectively). We manipulated temporal expectancy (TE) by presenting trials in ‘expect-early’ blocks which consisted of 85% trials with early targets and 15% with late targets and vice versa for ‘expect-late’ blocks. We found that expecting a sensory event at a specific time point significantly enhances detection performance. This expectancy benefit is particularly pronounced for the AV conditions in the expect-early compared to late condition. In the discrimination experiment, a significant TE benefit was observed only in the AV condition with AV target. Collectively, our data extend previous findings from unisensory expectancy and demonstrate a selective TE effect being more pronounced for AV compared to unisensory conditions.

Affiliations: 1: Otto-von-Guericke-Universität, Germany

We investigated the effect of attending to a specific period in time on low-intensity target detection in two psychophysical experiments. In the first experiment, participants were asked to detect a deviant target within a regular distractor sequence. Five experimental conditions were used: in the auditory-only condition, the target was a frequency modulated tone presented in a train of 14 pure tone distractors. In the visual-only condition, the target was a Gabor patch with a higher contrast compared to Gabor distractors. In all three AV conditions, auditory and visual trains of distractors were presented simultaneously but each condition differed for target type (i.e.: auditory-only, visual-only or AV target). In the second experiment, participants performed a frequency-discrimination instead of simple detection task. In both experiments, the target could appear either after a short or a long interval (400 or 1400 ms after first stimulus onset, respectively). We manipulated temporal expectancy (TE) by presenting trials in ‘expect-early’ blocks which consisted of 85% trials with early targets and 15% with late targets and vice versa for ‘expect-late’ blocks. We found that expecting a sensory event at a specific time point significantly enhances detection performance. This expectancy benefit is particularly pronounced for the AV conditions in the expect-early compared to late condition. In the discrimination experiment, a significant TE benefit was observed only in the AV condition with AV target. Collectively, our data extend previous findings from unisensory expectancy and demonstrate a selective TE effect being more pronounced for AV compared to unisensory conditions.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/22134808/26/10/22134808_026_00_S123_text.html;jsessionid=nAl3xuzfOAkWG0I0sDc7NYO3.x-brill-live-02?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0123&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0123
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0123
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0123
2013-05-16
2016-12-06

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation