Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Full Access Audiovisual temporal integration in adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Audiovisual temporal integration in adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

  • PDF
  • HTML
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Multisensory Research
For more content, see Seeing and Perceiving and Spatial Vision.

The ability to integrate auditory and visual information is important for everyday life. The Temporal Integration Window (TIW) measures how much asynchrony can be tolerated between auditory and visual streams before one loses the perception of a unitary audiovisual event. Previous investigations of TIW in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) show mixed results in how performance compares to typically developed individuals (TD). The current study looked at TIW across a range of audiovisual stimuli to further examine this issue. The stimuli included the following audiovisual pairings: (1) a beep with a flashing circle (BF), (2) a point-light drummer with a drumbeat (PLD), (3) a face moving to say a single word and the voice saying the word (FV). Eleven adult males with ASD, and their age, sex and IQ matches were shown the three audiovisual stimuli with varying degrees of audiovisual asynchrony. In separate blocks participants were asked to make either Temporal Order Judgements (TOJ) or Synchrony Judgements (SJ) when presented with these stimuli. For both TOJ and SJ psychophysical fits to the data provided estimates of the Point of Subjective Synchrony (PSS) and the width of TIW. Individual ANOVAs on TIW and PSS for every stimulus type were ran using a within factor of judgement (SJ, TOJ) and a between factor of group (ASD, TD). These revealed no group differences in TIW or PSS. However, the FV TIW was significantly wider for TOJ than SJ. Additionally, PSS for all stimuli was significantly influenced by the types of judgements.

Affiliations: 1: University of Glasgow, UK

The ability to integrate auditory and visual information is important for everyday life. The Temporal Integration Window (TIW) measures how much asynchrony can be tolerated between auditory and visual streams before one loses the perception of a unitary audiovisual event. Previous investigations of TIW in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) show mixed results in how performance compares to typically developed individuals (TD). The current study looked at TIW across a range of audiovisual stimuli to further examine this issue. The stimuli included the following audiovisual pairings: (1) a beep with a flashing circle (BF), (2) a point-light drummer with a drumbeat (PLD), (3) a face moving to say a single word and the voice saying the word (FV). Eleven adult males with ASD, and their age, sex and IQ matches were shown the three audiovisual stimuli with varying degrees of audiovisual asynchrony. In separate blocks participants were asked to make either Temporal Order Judgements (TOJ) or Synchrony Judgements (SJ) when presented with these stimuli. For both TOJ and SJ psychophysical fits to the data provided estimates of the Point of Subjective Synchrony (PSS) and the width of TIW. Individual ANOVAs on TIW and PSS for every stimulus type were ran using a within factor of judgement (SJ, TOJ) and a between factor of group (ASD, TD). These revealed no group differences in TIW or PSS. However, the FV TIW was significantly wider for TOJ than SJ. Additionally, PSS for all stimuli was significantly influenced by the types of judgements.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/22134808/26/10/22134808_026_00_S146_text.html;jsessionid=bjp8VbFeimrKxyVtEKHNdO1w.x-brill-live-03?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0146&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0146
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0146
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0146
2013-05-16
2016-12-09

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation