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Full Access The neurochronometry of reading in the blind

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The neurochronometry of reading in the blind

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image of Multisensory Research
For more content, see Seeing and Perceiving and Spatial Vision.

Using a visual-to-auditory sensory-substitution algorithm, congenitally fully blind adults were taught to read letters and words using ‘soundscapes’ — sounds topographically representing images. High resolution fMRI was used to examine key questions regarding the neurochronometry of the reading process in the blind: the areas which are involved in the reading network of the blind in the different phases of the process and the onset latencies of the different areas participating in the network. The central foci of the reading network of the blind were found to be a subset of the areas involved in the reading of degraded stimuli. Further, the onset of the reading process begins in the auditory cortex and then moves to occipital cortex and roughly follows the processing hierarchy expected in the sighted individuals.

Affiliations: 1: 1Department of Medical Neurobiology, Institute for Medical Research Israel–Canada (IMRIC), The Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel

Using a visual-to-auditory sensory-substitution algorithm, congenitally fully blind adults were taught to read letters and words using ‘soundscapes’ — sounds topographically representing images. High resolution fMRI was used to examine key questions regarding the neurochronometry of the reading process in the blind: the areas which are involved in the reading network of the blind in the different phases of the process and the onset latencies of the different areas participating in the network. The central foci of the reading network of the blind were found to be a subset of the areas involved in the reading of degraded stimuli. Further, the onset of the reading process begins in the auditory cortex and then moves to occipital cortex and roughly follows the processing hierarchy expected in the sighted individuals.

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/content/journals/10.1163/22134808-000s0153
2013-05-16
2016-12-05

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