Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Open Access Assessing Indigenous Forms of Writing

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Assessing Indigenous Forms of Writing

  • HTML
  • PDF
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

José de Acosta’s View of Andean Quipus in Contrast with Chinese “Letters”

image of Journal of Jesuit Studies

In this article, the Jesuit José de Acosta’s interest in Andean quipus is analyzed as it evolved throughout his works, beginning in the preface of De procuranda indorum salute (1588) and reaching a point of arrival in his Historia natural y moral de las Indias (1590). In De procuranda, Acosta established different categories of “barbaric nations,” placing the Indians from Mexico and Peru after the Chinese and Japanese. The latter belonged to the first category of “barbaric nations” because of their judgement, a stable republic, laws, fortified cities, and—most importantly in Acosta’s eyes—use and knowledge of letters. In the Historia Acosta resumed aspects of this classification, with a focus on letters—or the lack of them—and writing, bringing China to the forefront. The difference with De procuranda was that Acosta’s Historia fed on fresh information from the first Jesuits to establish a mission in China, Michele Ruggieri (1543–1607) and Matteo Ricci (1552–1640), which invigorated Acosta’s analysis of letters, writing, and all that in his view could not be considered “letters” or “writing.” In the first section of this article, Acosta’s views on Andean quipus are analyzed, based mainly on his experience in the Peru mission. In the second section, focus shifts to Acosta’s analysis of letters and writing, especially in his Historia, in which China played a preeminent role, bringing out interesting points of comparison with the Andean quipus. In the conclusion, are reflections on Acosta’s own view of indigenous forms of writing in contrast with alphabetic script.

Affiliations: 1: Marie Curie Fellow, Gerda Henkel Foundation, University of Heidelberg, ana.hosne@asia-europe.uni-heidelberg.de

In this article, the Jesuit José de Acosta’s interest in Andean quipus is analyzed as it evolved throughout his works, beginning in the preface of De procuranda indorum salute (1588) and reaching a point of arrival in his Historia natural y moral de las Indias (1590). In De procuranda, Acosta established different categories of “barbaric nations,” placing the Indians from Mexico and Peru after the Chinese and Japanese. The latter belonged to the first category of “barbaric nations” because of their judgement, a stable republic, laws, fortified cities, and—most importantly in Acosta’s eyes—use and knowledge of letters. In the Historia Acosta resumed aspects of this classification, with a focus on letters—or the lack of them—and writing, bringing China to the forefront. The difference with De procuranda was that Acosta’s Historia fed on fresh information from the first Jesuits to establish a mission in China, Michele Ruggieri (1543–1607) and Matteo Ricci (1552–1640), which invigorated Acosta’s analysis of letters, writing, and all that in his view could not be considered “letters” or “writing.” In the first section of this article, Acosta’s views on Andean quipus are analyzed, based mainly on his experience in the Peru mission. In the second section, focus shifts to Acosta’s analysis of letters and writing, especially in his Historia, in which China played a preeminent role, bringing out interesting points of comparison with the Andean quipus. In the conclusion, are reflections on Acosta’s own view of indigenous forms of writing in contrast with alphabetic script.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/journals/22141332/1/2/22141332_001_02_S002_text.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/22141332-00102002&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/22141332-00102002
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/22141332-00102002
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/22141332-00102002
2014-03-12
2018-10-18

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation