Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Open Access My Child Deus

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

My Child Deus

  • PDF
  • HTML
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

Grammar versus Theology in a Japanese Christian Devotional of 1591

image of Journal of Jesuit Studies

Manoel Barreto’s Japanese miscellany contains “Dialogues on the Instruments of the Passion,” which show how closely complex cultural structures are intertwined with the machinery of grammar. Featuring the Virgin Mary and Mary Magdalene, the dialogue sublimates maternal and erotic energies in turn while contemplating the usual series of violent instruments. The speeches display not only linguistic competence but literary skill in their use of the personless poetic flow of renga linked verse and the noh theatre. However, the Latinate double-entendre on filho [son (of God and of Mary)] misfires because the Japanese language uses honorifics to maintain stable intersubjective reference and so cannot simultaneously refer to Jesus as both a superior and an inferior. This failure is supplemented with Portuguese marginalia and bold catachresms. Mary Magdalene’s erotic sublimation is presented with less success as excessive literalism frequently produces comedy. Then, an appendix entitled “The Meaning of the Passion” repeats the exercise in halting, clinical prose marred by occasional errors of grammar and style, cataloguing the instruments as dōgu (implements), the word used for art objects in the tea ceremony, and outlining their theological function with attention to precise doctrinal formulations. Frequent use of Portuguese loanwords conveys a (justified) anxiety with regard to the ability of the Japanese language to transmit (European) truth. I identify the dueling Zeami and Aquinas of this piece as a Japanese convert and his or her European mentor, then venture a hypothesis as to the precise historical figures behind these voices in tension.

Affiliations: 1: Princeton University, pschwemm@princeton.edu

Manoel Barreto’s Japanese miscellany contains “Dialogues on the Instruments of the Passion,” which show how closely complex cultural structures are intertwined with the machinery of grammar. Featuring the Virgin Mary and Mary Magdalene, the dialogue sublimates maternal and erotic energies in turn while contemplating the usual series of violent instruments. The speeches display not only linguistic competence but literary skill in their use of the personless poetic flow of renga linked verse and the noh theatre. However, the Latinate double-entendre on filho [son (of God and of Mary)] misfires because the Japanese language uses honorifics to maintain stable intersubjective reference and so cannot simultaneously refer to Jesus as both a superior and an inferior. This failure is supplemented with Portuguese marginalia and bold catachresms. Mary Magdalene’s erotic sublimation is presented with less success as excessive literalism frequently produces comedy. Then, an appendix entitled “The Meaning of the Passion” repeats the exercise in halting, clinical prose marred by occasional errors of grammar and style, cataloguing the instruments as dōgu (implements), the word used for art objects in the tea ceremony, and outlining their theological function with attention to precise doctrinal formulations. Frequent use of Portuguese loanwords conveys a (justified) anxiety with regard to the ability of the Japanese language to transmit (European) truth. I identify the dueling Zeami and Aquinas of this piece as a Japanese convert and his or her European mentor, then venture a hypothesis as to the precise historical figures behind these voices in tension.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/journals/22141332/1/3/22141332_001_03_S006_text.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/22141332-00103006&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/22141332-00103006
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/22141332-00103006
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/22141332-00103006
2014-04-01
2017-11-24

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation